Category Archives: UK

Most expensive countries to study in for international students?

The following is what HSBC concluded international students will pay to attend university in various countries.

Country Annual fees (USD) Annual cost of living (USD) Annual total (USD)
Australia 25,375 13,140 38,516
United States 25,226 10,479 35,705
United Kingdom 19,291 11,034 30,325
United Arab Emirates 21,371 6,004 27,375
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Singapore 14,885 9,363 24,248
Hong Kong 13,182 9,261 22,443
Japan 6,522 12,642 19,164
Russia 3,131 6,310 9,441
China 3,983 4,783 8,766
Taiwan 3,270 4,987 8,257
Spain 1,002 6,004 7,006
Germany 635 5,650 6,285

 

Australia, surpsingly comes in at the highest, which is incredibly deceptive. Firstly, an Australian (and UK) degree, will typically take you three years while Canadian and US degress take four years. Secondly, HSBC uses tuition soures based on what Forbes list, but it is unclear if they are using the “ten largest” or the Ivy League or what? Since the ten largest US institutions are not considered the elite of the US. Furthermore, many students receive discounts in the form of financial aid at the top US colleges, but those are tied to a family’s ability to pay.  Since the typical ivy league education (Princeton) is $56,750, this puts a US education well ahead of Australia. Moreover, if we extraoplate over 4 years, this hits a whopping $227,000 whereas Australia comes in 115,548, or almost half. UK comes in at about 91K. Canada rounds out just over $104 K. 

Why Canada get’s two entries just adds to the sloppy presentation. 

And why would they leave out some stellar international destinations like the Netherlands, Switzerland or New Zealand?

Australia the most expensive country?

The following is what HSBC concluded international students will pay to attend university in various countries.

Country Annual fees (USD) Annual cost of living (USD) Annual total (USD)
Australia 25,375 13,140 38,516
United States 25,226 10,479 35,705
United Kingdom 19,291 11,034 30,325
United Arab Emirates 21,371 6,004 27,375
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Singapore 14,885 9,363 24,248
Hong Kong 13,182 9,261 22,443
Japan 6,522 12,642 19,164
Russia 3,131 6,310 9,441
China 3,983 4,783 8,766
Taiwan 3,270 4,987 8,257
Spain 1,002 6,004 7,006
Germany 635 5,650 6,285

 

Australia, surpsingly comes in at the highest, which is incredibly deceptive. Firstly, an Australian (and UK) degree, will typically take you three years while Canadian and US degress take four years. Secondly, HSBC uses tuition soures based on what Forbes list, but it is unclear if they are using the “ten largest” or the Ivy League or what? Since the ten largest US institutions are not considered the elite of the US. Furthermore, many students receive discounts in the form of financial aid at the top US colleges, but those are tied to a family’s ability to pay.  Since the typical ivy league education (Princeton) is $56,750, this puts a US education well ahead of Australia. Moreover, if we extraoplate over 4 years, this hits a whopping $227,000 whereas Australia comes in 115,548, or almost half. UK comes in at about 91K. Canada rounds out just over $104 K. 

Why Canada get’s two entries just adds to the sloppy presentation. 

And why would they leave out some stellar international destinations like the Netherlands, Switzerland or New Zealand?

SO where should the future wealth seekers go if the US is not their destination? Wealth-X figured it out for you. 

PHOTO: The Chapel, Keble College, Oxford University, Oxford.
Getty Images
1.
University of Oxford

United Kingdom

372 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: Aerial View of the Rajabai Clock Tower, Bombay Stock Exchange Building, Mumbai University and Mumbai City in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
Shriya Patil/The India Today Group/Getty Images
2.
University of Mumbai

India

361 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: University of Cambridge, King's College, view from Great St. Mary's Church.
Getty Images
3.
University of Cambridge

United Kingdom

273 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The main entrance to the London School of Economics.
Umezo Kamata/Wikipedia
4.
London School of Economics and Political Science

United Kingdom

247 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The Great Hall of the University of Sydney.
Toby Hudson/Wikipedia
5.
University of Sydney

Australia

229 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The University of Dehli main building.
seek1/Wikipedia
6.
University of Delhi

India

211 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The Asia campus of Insead stands in Singapore, Dec. 6, 2010.
Munshi Ahmed/Bloomberg via Getty Images
7.
Insead

France

176 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The Australian School of Business building at the University of New South Wales.
unsw.flickr/flickr
8.
University of New South Wales

Australia

163 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: Engineering building at the National University of Singapore.
Wikipedia
9.
National University of Singapore

Singapore

155 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The main administration building of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.
pfctdayelise/Wikipedia
10.
Tsinghua University

China

136 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

11.
Peking University

China

128 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

12.
McGill University

Canada

127 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

13.
Imperial College London

United Kingdom

123 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

14.
University of Melbourne

Australia

123 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

15.
University of Toronto

Canada

115 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

16.
Monash University

Australia

110 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

17.
Trinity College Dublin

Ireland

106 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

18.
London Business School

United Kingdom

101 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

19.
University of Technology, Sydney

Australia

99 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

20.
University College London

United Kingdom

So you want to be a billionaire

Good for you. Where should you go to college to give you that competative advantage? Does it surprise anyone that Harvard tops the list?

You can get the whole shebang here. Registration required. 

Trend #5: The Quest for Geographic Diversity!

Another installment of this year’s trends in college admission series with Trend #5: The Quest for Geographic Diversity! You can check out previous posts here:

Yep, everyone does it and everyone is celebrating it. Diversity is more than just skin color, but includes:

  • Geographic Diversity
  • Academic Diversity
  • Extracurricular Diversity
  • Ethnic/Racial Diversity
  • Socioeconomic and Geographic Diversity
  • Age Diversity

Colleges want diversity for precisely the perceptiveness mocked above:

1. Diversity expands worldliness. College might be the first time you have had the opportunity to have real interaction with people from diverse groups. Whether we like it or not, many times we find ourselves segregated from other groups in schools, churches, and our own neighborhoods. A college campus is like opening the door to the entire world without traveling anywhere else.

2. Diversity enhances social development. Interacting with people from a variety of groups widens your social circle by expanding the pool of people with whom you can associate and develop relationships. Consider how boring your conversations would be if you only had friends who had everything in common with you.

3. Diversity prepares students for future career success. Successful performance in today’s diverse workforce requires sensitivity to human differences and the ability to relate to people from different cultural backgrounds. America’s workforce is more diverse than at any time in the nation’s history, and the percentage of America’s working-age population comprised of members of minority groups is expected to increase from 34 percent to 55 percent by 2050.

4. Diversity prepares students for work in a global society. No matter what profession you enter, you’ll find yourself working with employers, employees, coworkers, customers and clients from diverse backgrounds—worldwide. By experiencing diversity in college, you are laying the groundwork to be comfortable working and interacting with a variety of individuals of all nationalities.

5. Interactions with people different from ourselves increase our knowledge base. Research consistently shows that we learn more from people who are different from us than we do from people who are similar to us. Just as you “think harder” when you encounter new material in a college course, you will do the same when you interact with a diverse group of people.

6. Diversity promotes creative thinking. Diversity expands your capacity for viewing issues or problems from multiple perspectives, angles, and vantage points. These diverse vantage points work to your advantage when you encounter new problems in different contexts and situations. Rather than viewing the world through a single-focus lens, you are able to expand your views and consider multiple options when making decisions and weighing issues of, for example, morality and ethics.

7. Diversity enhances self-awareness. Learning from people whose backgrounds and experiences differ from your own sharpens your self-knowledge and self-insight by allowing you to compare and contrast your life experiences with others whose life experiences differ sharply from your own. By being more self-aware, you are more capable of making informed decisions about your academic and professional future.

8. Diversity enriches the multiple perspectives developed by a liberal arts education. Diversity magnifies the power of a general education by helping to liberate you from the tunnel vision of an ethnocentric and egocentric viewpoint. By moving beyond yourself, you gain a panoramic perspective of the world around you and a more complete view of your place in it.

Of course  diversity has come with some backlash. But the reality for universities is that international students bring more than just diversity. Many are counted on for being full fee payers, as this graph from Arizona so clearly illustrates:

To be fair, many students can impact the bottom line of the financial health of a college, but the key international students can get a huge leg up, in places like Scotland during clearing, after a record number of EU students planned to come to Scotland for free.

Research by this newspaper found 72 law courses across Scotland were taking applications from foreigners yesterday even though just 42 had vacancies for domestic school leavers.

Almost 149 maths courses were available for international students compared with just 47 for home students, while 76 chemistry courses had foreign vacancies against 30 taking Scottish candidates.

Sadly, England seems to be missing the point of international students as it effectively booted out 2000 students for a universities lack of organization and policing. Moreover, International students ARE the economic impact: “Going beyond creative writing, a recent Oxford Economics case-study of Exeter University showed that every 10 international students support six British jobs.”

Nova Scotia issued a report on the impact on international students just a few years ago. This has been expanded on by the government of Canada who has come to realise

According to a study by Foreign Affairs and International Canada, international students spent about $8-billion on tuition, accommodations, discretionary spending and associated tourism in 2010. This spending is greater than Canada’s export of unwrought aluminum, helicopters, airplanes or spacecraft. The educational services and programs Canada provides abroad form our 11th-largest national export and our single-largest export to China.

The Globe and Mail has an excellent video discussion on the impact of international students:

LEADING THINKERS VIDEO: THE BATTLE FOR BRAINS

Stephen Toope: How international students change Canadian schools

Stephen Toope, president of the University of British ColumbiaStephen Toope, president of the University of British Columbia Rafal Gerszak/for The Globe and Mail

LEADING THINKERS VIDEO: THE BATTLE FOR BRAINS

Part 2: Why we need to assert our stake in the global brain race

Stephen Toope, president of the University of British ColumbiaStephen Toope, president of the University of British Columbia Rafal Gerszak/for The Globe and Mail

LEADING THINKERS VIDEO: THE BATTLE FOR BRAINS

Part 3: How universities can help Canada become a global leader

Free tuition for life

Cardiff University has a contest with the winner receiving free tuition for life–as many courses and degrees the student wants. It is unclear how the contest will work, but there will be challenges:

To earn this once-in-a-lifetime prize you’ll really have to show you’re capable of setting the world alight by thriving in various challenges. Each one, more difficult than the last, will test you for the type of qualities we expect our students to have, such as passion, commitment and intelligence.

Could this have anything to do with the fact that applications are down a whopping 15% over last year?  True, Welsh student applications are down only 10%, but still the university wants to thrive-which happens to be the name of the competition.

World’s top 200 universities


1 California Institute of Technology United States
2 Harvard University United States
2 Stanford University United States
4 University of Oxford United Kingdom
5 Princeton University United States
6 University of Cambridge United Kingdom
7 Massachusetts Institute of Technology United States
8 Imperial College London United Kingdom
9 University of Chicago United States
10 University of California, Berkeley United States

See complete list of rankings here.

What can you do with a major in

Many us colleges have long maintained useful websites helping students understand the connection between their chosen major and different career paths. Some provide more generalized infomation like Kansas State or UNC Wilmington or University of Tennessee. Some associations try and provide concrete paths for such areas as History or psychology or Anthropology. Others drawn on conrete data. For example: UC Berkeley surveys their students each year to create a rich tapestry. Students studied Japanese reported that those employed (38%) were equally split between Government and education (40% each) with teh rest in non-profit. 6% were in grad school, 31% were looking for work, but another 37% are doing some vague other endevor.

Chemical Engineering on the other hand has higher employment (48%) and Grad school (4%) and less looking for employment (3%) or doing other endevors (9%). 90% are emplyed in for-profit and 10% in Government. They go onto to give listing of companies and salaries.

The government of the UK  maintains detailed information in unistats. These are pure  stats with little offered in description. The Guardian comes to teh rsuce with series on “What to do with a degree in...”

They have already compiled 28 listings. Looking at drama they do a nice job of summarizing skills that you will gain:

Confidence and self-presentation, analytical skills, self-discipline and an ability (hopefully) to handle criticism. You will also be used to working in a team and have developed good research skills, as most courses tend to involve a major research project or dissertation.

And match this with a nice graphic:

Field Guide to Design

Field Guide to Design

What is the study?

Industrial Design

Interior Design

·

Graphic Design

Learn about it at YouTube:

Magazines

Podcasts worth listening to:

Courses

Five great programs

USA

UK

Canada

Australia

RISD

Central Saint Martins

Concordia University

Swinburne University

Purdue

Loughborough

Ontario College of Art and Design

University of Western Sydney

Carnegie Mellon

Brunell

University of Alberta

University of New South Wales

University of Illinois

University of Glasgow

University of Toronto

Curtin University

Ohio State University

York University

Carleton University

Australia Academy of Design

What can you do with a degree in Design?

· Graphic design (UTK): http://career.utk.edu/wcidwtm/html/graphicdesign.html

· Interior Design (UTK): http://career.utk.edu/wcidwtm/html/interiordesign.html

· Industrial Design (NCSU): http://www.ncsu.edu/majors-careers/do_with_major_in/showmajor.php?id=37

Books for the UK

There are a wealth of resources in the UK. Aside from many webresources, here are some of the best books, my personal favorities are in this carosel (Click on the title to take you to the Amazon store).

Many like those published by UCAS (but buying them on Amazon.uk will save you money and they ship anywhere in the world):

And finally specific help with personal statements and the application process

Not what you wanted? Use the search box below: