Category Archives: rankings

The US Government scored all colleges in the US. The gang at NPR crunched some numbers and did what the public demanded: Ranked them. Not once, not twice, but three times. Each time they focused on a different formula, but the same data set, provided in the College Score Card:

  • Schools That Make You Money–Anthony Carnevale’s ratings include: income 10 years after entry (50%), on-time graduation rates (25%) and net price (25%).
  • Schools That Make Financial Sense–Peter Cappelli’s rating includes: on-time graduation rate (50%), default rate (16%), share of students receiving federal loans (16%), average income six years after entry (16%).
  • Schools That Emphasize Upward Mobility–Amy Laitinen’s rating would include: share of students who receive Pell Grants (16%), net price for families making less than $48,000 (16%), share of students who are first-generation college students (16%), default rates (16%), on-time graduation rates (16%) and median income 10 years after entry (16%).

I have put the top 10 in a table and compared how the numbers compare with the big three ranking instruments. Here is what I got:

 

 

Make you Money

Upward Mobility

Financial sense

US News

Forbes

Washington Monthly

Harvard University

1

1

8

2

6

8

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2

2

5

7

10

15

Princeton University

3

11

21

1

4

26

Stanford University

4

3

3

4

3

5

Babson College

5

35

15

     

Georgia Institute of Technology

6

41

 

36

90

9

Georgetown University

7

17

4

21

23

109

University of Pennsylvania

8

14

2

9

12

37

University of the Sciences

9

 

24

     

Harvey Mudd College

10

 

9

14

57

5

Can I draw any conclusion from this? While some schools like Harvard and Stanford are excellent, regardless of the measure used, others have such bizzare ranges like Georgetown who ranges from number 4 to 109. So the conclusion: Beware of teh rankings. Look carefully at the methodology. Cross tabulate. 

Entrepreneurship incubators in the form of colleges

Want to create your own business? Head to business correct? Hang on, not so fast, at least according to Linked In and the editors of Forbes Magazine. On their 2015 Americas most entrepreneurial colleges, only 2 speciality busines schools made the list. In fact, most of these colleges do not even offer a business program. To arrive at their rankings, Forbes “ranked the country’s most entrepreneurial schools based on the entrepreneurial ratios – the total number of alumni and students who have identified themselves as founders and business owners on LinkedIn, divided by the school’s student body (undergraduate and graduate combined).” They did the same for comprehsnive universities. I like their methodlogy as it focuses on what students actually do, rather than what the college says they do.I wish they provided the actual ratios so you could compare the university list with the college list. 

The granddaddy of Entrepreneurial rankings come from Entrepreneurial Magazine, a publication that should know a lot about starting a business. They outsource the porject to Princeton Review: “The survey asked school administrators 60 questions covering: their schools’ levels of commitment to entrepreneurship inside and outside the classroom, the percentage of faculty, students, and alumni actively and successfully involved in entrepreneurial endeavors, and the number and reach of their mentorship programs. The company also asked schools about their scholarships and grants for entrepreneurial studies, and their support for school-sponsored business plan competitions.” While their rankings seem to make sense when you look at it, in terms of academic preparation. But do they hold up to the real world test? Of the top 24 programs they ranked, only 8 made the rgade on Forbes/Linked in rankings that actually exmine who are entrepreneurs (at least say they are in their Linked-In Profile). 

How about another list, put out by College Choice? They have rather nebulous criteria: “Through an analysis of data from Crunchbase, Angel List, public business data, and other factors (such as proximity to major metropolitan entrepreneurial ecosystems), we have brought you a list of the 50 best colleges in the U.S. for aspiring entrepreneurs.” Comparing Collegechoice with Princeton Review/Entrepeurship Magazine we see a higher levelof cross over with 11 schools appear on both lists. Only 7 schools appear on all three lists. 

 

Princeton Reivew/Entrpreneurship

Forbes/linked in

College Choice

1. Babson College

 

33

2. University of Houston

 

 

3. Baylor University

 

50

4. Brigham Young University

17

32

5. University of Oklahoma

 

 

6. Syracuse University

41

48

7. Northeastern University

13

40

8. University of Southern California

28

5

9. Baruch College

 

 

10. Miami University

36

 

11. Temple University

 

 

12. Uni. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

41

13. University of Dayton

 

 

14. Clarkson University

 

 

15. DePaul University

 

 

16. Washington University in St. Louis

 

 

17. Lehigh University

44

 

18. University of Michigan

43

8

19. University of Washington

45

16

20. Texas Christian University

 

 

21. University of Maryland

29

20

22. University of Arizona

 

43

23. Saint Louis Univers

 

 

24. Bradley University

 

 

 

So which list should you believe? Like any ranking, the key lies in the methodology: One set of criteria will review different facets. Reading beneath the text, what you should be looking for are schools that:

  • Start up money to get you going (this may be in the form of a competition
  • Provide real world mentoring opportunities so you have someone who has been there/done that to bounce ideas off of
  • A club or group that gives you the kindred spirits to support you
  • A rigourous training in critical and original thinking and problem identification

Some examples:

  • Tufts University boasts an Entrepreneurial Leaderships Studies (ELS) program specifically for undergraduates. The Tufts Entrepreneurial Network keeps students connected to on-campus entrepreneurial activities as well as to alumni, and the Entrepreneurial Society sponsors several competitions, conferences, and networking opportunities.
  • the University of California Irvine is home to the Don Beall Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, which offers students opportunities to immerse themselves in a culture of innovation, ideas, and best practices. One of the most popular activities at the school is the annual Business Plan Competition, which offers over $100,000 in cash prizes for the most promising startup ideas. Merage offers a BA in Business Administration with several opportunities for specialization.
  • RPI has has eight Entrepreneurs in Residence, all successful business leaders.
  • At Middlebury, The four-week immersion program MiddCore has brought in over 40 entrepreneur mentors such as Peet’s Coffee and Tea CEO Dave Burwick.
  • Thanks to $1 million from alum and VC Michael Vlock, Hampshire is shelling out $200,000 a year to student ventures.

Where are you at with your entreneurial chops? Check out Gallup’s Entrepreneurial Strengthsfinder which rates you on the 10 talents of successful entrepreneurs:

  • Business Focus: You make decisions based on observed or anticipated effect on profit.
  • Confidence: You accurately know yourself and understand others.
  • Creative Thinker: You exhibit creativity in taking an existing idea or product and turning it into something better.
  • Delegator: You recognize that you cannot do everything and are willing to contemplate a shift in style and control.
  • Determination: You persevere through difficult, even seemingly insurmountable, obstacles.
  • Independent: You are prepared to do whatever needs to be done to build a successful venture.
  • Knowledge-Seeker: You constantly search for information that is relevant to growing your business.
  • Promoter: You are the best spokesperson for the business.
  • Relationship-Builder: You have high social awareness and an ability to build relationships that are beneficial for the firm’s survival and growth.
  • Risk-Taker: You instinctively know how to manage high-risk situations.

 

 

 

 

Plexuss does rankings

Not sure how long this thing has been around, but they need some serious help in defining what a good college experience is. Founder JP Novin claims “I have never been more excited about a company as I am today about Plexuss. We are in the business of changing student’s future. Nothing can be more exciting.” Except, they are actively misleading students with their poorly executed rankings:

Of course they leave out the “speial sauce” which seems like a rather key ingrediant. The rankings look familiar although it does give a boost to public universities, with 5 appearing in the top 20 (US News has 1 ), but totally punishes Liberal arts and science colleges. Williams in 219? Amherst comes in 223, but University of Massachusetts-Amherst comes in 62nd? Swarthmore comes in at 220. 

Clearly their formula is bunk. Obviously they choose measures that favor research output over the learning experience. Worse they cannot even set their toggles right to get the correct information. While QS, Shanghai and Reuters don’t even collect college data on Liberal arts colleges, US news does. They keep it seperate from the research universities for a reason. Take a look at Swarthmore, one of the serious power hitters in higher education and yet they managed to find 219 better colleges. 

While I like the idea of a super agregator, this one is not working. Obvioulsy, not only should they use the actual liberal arts measure, but the Washington Monthly ranking would probably be wise to include. While QS, Reuters and Shanghai could be included in the National Research universities, they need to be left off for the LACs. For what it is worth, here is the top 20. 

#1
Harvard University
Cambridge,MA
#2
#7
#2
#2
#5
#2
#3
#3
#7
#5
#1
#4
#1
#4
#7
#5
Yale University
New Haven,CT
#3
#6
#4
#6
#10
#21
#7
#7
#5
#24
#5
#9
#7
#12
#8
#10
#7
#23
#13

#11
#20
#37
#14
#12
#16
#31
#10
#13
#12
#67
#11
#14
#12
#19
#15
#15
#23
#44
#17
#16
#28
#45
#12
#17
Brown University
Providence,RI
#14
#13
#19
#18
#23
#59
#22
#19
#41
#70
#16
#20
#41
#68
#21

Linked in now ranking out

Linked-in is jumping into the rankings game (again):

  1. First, we identified the top companies where software developers are choosing to work.
  2. Next, we found people on LinkedIn who work as software developersand saw where they went to school.
  3. Finally, for each school, we found the percentage of these alumni who’ve landed software development jobs at these top companies, then compared the percentages to come up with the list.

So, if you care about outcomes the Linked-In Rankings may be just the thing you need. Given that Linked=In is the Go To Network for professionals, it is an interesting place to datamine

Huge samples and granular details make the new rankings interesting, Schneider said, whether or not they really take off as a consumer guide to college.

“They’re getting smart about how to tap into this big database,” he said of LinkedIn. “This is big data.”

Taking a closer look at one ranking, the accounting, we can guage how it compares to other well known rankings:

 

 

Linked-In

USNEWS

Business

week

Acct

report

Super ranking

Villanova University

1

 

 

 

 

University of Notre Dame

2

4

2

5

3

Boston College

3

 

 

 

 

Lehigh University

4

 

 

 

 

Emory University

5

 

 

 

 

University of Southern California

6

5

 

6

7

Fairfield University

7

 

 

 

 

Santa Clara University

8

 

 

 

 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

9

2

5

2

2

Wake Forest University

10

 

9

 

8

Only two colleges appear on all lists: The fighting Irish and the mighty Illini. The Linked in one does raise eyebrows because so many of the schools do NOT appear on other lists.  

Super ranking: http://www.accounting-degree.org/best-accounting-schools/

#1. Brigham Young University, Marriott School of Management

#2. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign College of Business

#3. The University of Notre Dame, Mendoza College of Business

#4. University of Texas at Austin, McCombs Schools of Business

#5. Indiana University, Kelley School of Business

#6. University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School

#7. University of Southern California, Marshall School of Business

#8. Wake Forest University School of Business

#9. University of Washington, Foster School of Business

#10. University of Georgia, Terry College of Business

#11. Texas A&M University, Mays Business School

#12. University of Virginia, McIntire School of Commerce

#13. Michigan State University, Broad College of Business

#14. New York University, Stern School of Business

#15. Bentley University
#16. Arizona State University, W.P. Carey School of Business

#17. University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Business

#18. Penn State University, Smeal College of Business

#19. Ohio State University, Fisher College of Business

#20. University of Florida, Warrington College of Business Administration

#21. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, Ross School of Business

#22. University of California, Berkeley, Haas School of Business

#23. Cornell University, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management
#24. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler School of Business

#25. Southern Methodist University, Cox School of Business

#26. University of Missouri, Trulaske College of Business

#27. Boston College, Carroll School of Management

#28. Miami University-Ohio, Farmer School of Business

#29. Northern Illinois University College of Business

#30. University of Tennessee College of Business Administration

 

 

 

Public accounting report ranking

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/news/documents/PARSurvey2013-BaruchRankings.pdf

1 1 University of Texas

2 2 University of Illinois

3 3 Brigham Young University

4 9 University of Mississippi

5 5 Notre Dame University

6 4 University of Southern California

7 10 Texas A&M University

8 6 Indiana University

9 8 University of Florida

10 7 The Ohio State University

 

Bloomberg Businessweek

1.

Brigham Young (Marriott)

1.067

2.

Notre Dame (Mendoza)

1.076

3.

UC Berkeley (Haas)

1.081

4.

Cornell (Dyson)

1.089

5.

Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1.116

6.

Tulsa (Collins)

1.118

7.

Richmond (Robins)

1.119

8.

Southern Methodist (Cox)

1.12

9.

Wake Forest

1.138

10.

Tulane (Freeman)

1.141

 

 

USNEWS

#1 University of Texas—?Austin

#2 University of Illinois—?Urbana-?Champaign

#3Brigham Young University—?Provo

#4 University of Notre Dame

#5 University of Pennsylvania

#5 University of Southern California

#7 University of Michigan—?Ann Arbor

#8 Indiana University Blommington

#9 New York University

#10 Ohio State University—?Columbus

 

 

“We do not aspire to be a party school.”

Congratulations to Syracuse. Apparently thy did not even try, and yet they are the number 1 party school in America. Then again, the guys in this photo hardly look like undergrads. Perhaps these are the professors. This marks a dramatic rise for the Orangemen, who two years ago were 10. They hope to match this improvement on other rankings such as USNEWS which apparently punishes them for taking poor kids who do not score so well on the SAT. 

Other party places in the top 5:

  • The University of Iowa (last year’s winner),
  • the University of California-Santa Barbara,
  • West Virginia University and
  • the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

For some reason, Syracuse does not like to be known as a party school:

“We are disappointed with the Princeton Review ranking, which is based on a two-year-old survey of a very small portion of our student body. Syracuse University has a long-established reputation for academic excellence with programs that are recognized nationally and internationally as the best in their fields. We do not aspire to be a party school. With new leadership, we are very focused on enhancing the student experience, both academically and socially. Students, parents, faculty and the full Syracuse University community should expect to see important and positive changes in the year ahead that will improve and enhance the student environment in every aspect.”

Sure Syrcuse would rather be known for it’s groundbreaking initiatives and approaches to teaching. Their alumni include Lou Reed, Aaron Sorkin, Carol Oats, Joe Bidden, Dick Clark and even the president of another praty school, Donna Shalala. Those are rather serious parties, if you ask me. Of course, Syrcuse did kinda bring this attention to themselves when they pulled out of the rather serious sounding Association of American Universities (before they got kicked out). Yet, they still do a tonne of research and make beautiful things

I say embrace your joyous students. Play hard, work hard. 

The BEST college is…

…it depends. 

Certainly it must be Harvard (Or Princeton or Stanford), but you would be wong if you were reading Forbes Best College Edition.  Money Magazine Named Babson the Best College for Your money in a new ranking. Frobes is the first out of the gate for the old standard barers, but others will be following soon:

 

Global Rankings

And the smartest college in America is…

MIT, At least according to Lumosity. They bill themselves as the Human Cognition project aiming to improve cognition by playing video games. With 50 million regsitered users, they have some data they can data mine.  This is a study of almost 90,000 people aged 17 to 25 who played Lumosity games. The graded the students on five facets: Speed, Attention, Flexibility, Memory and Problem Solving. Only universities 29th 50 or more players got rated. They ranked the universities based on average performance of the 50 or more players. MIT does come out on top, but only by .57 (113.88 vs 113. 31). The college of New Jersey ranked 50th with a score of 106.32, so perhaps that sliver is more pronounced than the number suggests. The paper goes into much more detail and explores the relationship between SAT and Lumosity scores. They then compare it to the US News ranking…most colleges fall where you woudl expect them. 

Here is lumosity rankings. 

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  2. Harvard University

  3. Stanford University

  4. Northwestern University

  5. Yale University

  6. Washington University in St Louis

  7. Dartmouth College

  8. Wellesley College

  9. Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

  10. Duke University

  11. College of William and Mary

  12. University of Pennsylvania

  13. University of Portland

  14. University of California-Berkeley

  15. Vanderbilt University

  16. University of Chicago

  17. Carnegie Mellon University

  18. Macalester College

  19. Worcester Polytechnic Institute

  20. University of California-Los Angeles

They then break it down by the five areas. The winners:

All very interesting items. Of course are the smart (or dumb) kids actually playing these games? And the whole question of whether brain games are bogus I leave to another. 

Return on investment–an actual good measure?

Years ago a teacher had this poster in their classroom as a way to motivate his students:

It always stuck me as the absolutely wrong reason to go to college. While it is true the college graduates do earn more than high school ones-earning 90% more than someone with just a high school diploma:

And there is a whole lote more when you start drilling into the data

Education vs Income Level in the USA Infographic

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But the average college graduate is more in debt than ever so they will need that job:

                  
                    The True Cost of College Infographic
                  

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                    Varsity
                      Tutors - Private Tutoring & Test Prep
On the other hand, more education is strongly correlated to hapiness

So while education can correlate to happiness, and being in debt sucks for happiness, too many people want to distill what is a complex set of factors to rank colleges.
Payscale has released their latest ranking based on Return on investment.

1
West Coast
Private Schools, Liberal Arts, Engineering
$73,300
$143,000
58%
2
South Atlantic
State Schools, Liberal Arts, For Sports Fans
$77,100
$131,000
69%
3 - tie
West Coast
Private Schools, Research Universities, Engineering
$68,400
$124,000
61%
3 - tie
Northeast
Private Schools, Research Universities, Engineering
$64,900
$124,000
48%
5
Northeast
Private Schools
$59,700
$123,000
39%
6
Northeast
Private Schools, Research Universities, Ivy League, For Sports Fans
$56,100
$121,000
46%
7
Northeast
State Schools, Liberal Arts, For Sports Fans
$74,000
$120,000
66%
8 - tie
West Coast
Private Schools, Research Universities, For Sports Fans
$61,300
$119,000
57%
8 - tie
Northeast
Private Schools, Research Universities, Ivy League, For Sports Fans
$55,300
$119,000
60%
8 - tie
Northeast
Private Schools, Research Universities, Ivy League, For Sports Fans
$52,300
$119,000
51%
Worth noting is that 8 of the top ten have particularly strong engineering programs. Indeed those science and engeering majors tend to pay the best:

 

Majors That Pay You Back

Majors That Pay You Back Methodology
Annual pay for bachelor’s graduates without higher degrees. Typical starting graduates have two years of experience; mid-career graduates have 15 years. See full methodology.

Richard Ekman, president of the Council of Independent Colleges worries about oversimplification of just money. “How do you measure the value of graduate school, the Peace Corps or Teach for America, all of which are low-paying? It’s scary to see some public official seize on these metrics as the be-all and end-all.”

To payscale’s credit, they did include majors that change the world

Majors That Change the World

Majors That Change the World Methodology
The percentage of graduates with a specific major who reported that their job makes the world a better place. See full methodology.

The New York Times compares Payscale’s rankings with USNews, leading people to wonder why colleges with way higher return on investment are ranked so much lower on US News Ranking (You can see a table comparing the highest ranking USNews Colleges vs ROI here). The Times mistakenly calls it a New Metric, but as followers of this blog will note we have reported on Payscale’s initiative in previous years. 

 

“People are desperate to measure something, so they seize on the wrong things,” Mark Edmundson, a professor of English at the University of Virginia (PayScale, 76), told me this week. “I’m not against people making a living or prospering. But if the objective of an education is to ‘know yourself,’ it’s going to be hard to measure that.”

US News Winners and Loosers

Last week I previewed the upcoming rankings…and now the results are out. The top 20 on either side is fairly predictable. 

Big Winner: BU up 10 places. Now tied with Lehigh University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the University of California, Santa Barbara, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Wisconsin–Madison

Winner: GWU-removed last year for falsifying data, now number 52. 

Looser: Tulane-Can’t seem to crack the top 50. 

Winner: Hopkins with the best performance in the past 14 years, but still cannot crack the top 10. 

Looser: Howard-dropping 22 places. Ouch. 

Winners: Pennsylvania State University, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Florida, Boston University and Yeshiva University in New York–all keeping the top tiew while University of Washington dropped out. UVM jumped 10 places, but still is a long way into cracking into the top tier. 

Winner: Clemson has it hits 21st in public Unis. 

Looser: University of Miami coming in at 47–they were just at 38. What happened?

Winner: UCONN: Keeps moving up. 

Winner: Wake forst now 23-best showing ever. Of course this is tempered by the five way tie of Carnegie Mellon University, the University of California-Los Angeles, the University of Southern California and the University of Virginia.

Winner: USNEWS for getting people to buy their magazine.

Looser: US for ever taking this stuff seriously .

For those that need a reminder why it is all nonsense head over to the Atlantic where they lay out the “best criticisms over the past 15 years:

  • An essay by Nicholas Thompson in The Washington Monthly, September, 2000.
  • A report from the University of Florida’s Center for Measuring University Performance, 2002.
  • An essay by Colin Diver, then president of Reed College, about the U.S. News rankings, his decision to withhold Reed’s participation in them, and the liberating consequences of that decision, in The Atlantic, November 2005.
  • A report from the Center for College Affordability and Productivity, March 2009.
  • An essay by Malcolm Gladwell in The New Yorker, February 2011.”

Alma Mata Index: Ranking universities by where their CEOs went to college

Time’s Higher Education continues to feed the monstor coming up with a ranking of Global universities based on where they went to universities. Simple enough premise: 

1) Take the 500 companies from the global 500 

2) Identify where their CEOs went to universities–all actual degress awarded. So say you went to University of Victoria for Undegraduate and University of Califronia, Berkeley for Graduate school, both universities get one point. 

3) Factor in the total revenue of the alumni CEOs’ companies-the more money, the higher the ranking. 

And voila you have a list. You can read the whole story here.

As one observer (Mark Freebairn, a partner at top City headhunters Odgers Berndtson) notes, “For prospective employers there is comfort in the fact that someone has been selected ahead of a lot of other applicants. It means they are obviously bright. Passing that selection process is an endorsement for employers.” Or is it just laziness?

Seriously, the sample size was less than 500 people. While many CEOs have two or three degress, this will only bump the number up slightly. Actually, for the top 100 universities, the tall of degress comes to 390 awarded. I expect there is a long tale of 100 more universities with one CEO. Certainly a typical CEO would have an undergaduate degree and a graduate school degree–probably MBA or Law. Indeed, the top 10 male CEOs have a total of 15 degrees collectively, or 1.5 on average. Female CEOs have to work harder (or perhaps are just smarter) judging by the number of degress earned-19, or 1.9 each. 84 universities had fewer than 6 degress awarded. Not exactly a resounding endorsement for such power houses as Columbia  or Yale(6), Oxford (5), USC (4), Umich (3) and Brown (2). 

Focusing only on the top 12, the sample size continues to be rediculously low coming in with a total of 159 degress awarded or just 13 each. While there might be some statsitical significance in relation to running a fortune 500 company, it pales in comparrision as to how many graduated from these same universities and are NOT running a fortune 500 company. Take Harvard, ranked number 1, with 31 degrees awarded. One can only asume that the degrees awarded spread out over multiple years and both undergraduate and graduate school. (A side note: Of the top 20 male and female CEOs, not one did their undergraudate at Harvard). Let’s just pretend that all CEOs graduated at the same time. 31 came from Harvard. In 2009, Harvard awarded a total of 7234 degrees (this includes undergraduate and graduate degrees like law and MBAs). 31 of 7234 went on to be CEOs. This would make a rather sad ratio of one in every 233 degrees, IF they all came from the same year. But they did not. They were spread out, one can fairly assume over a 20 year period. So let us guestimate that Harvard awards at least 7000 degrees every year for 20 years. So less than .03 percent of Harvard Degree earners went on to run a global 500 Comapny. Not exactly a reason to write home now is it?

To be fair, Harvard alum go onto to do MANY great things:

 

Fairburn acknowledges that ““While people still look at where a candidate went to university, and the quality of degree and what they studied, by the time someone is 45 with 20 years’ experience, it is less relevant. But it has an impact in the first three to five years. By then the advantage is established and it is difficult for laggards to catch up.”

Malcolm Gladwell took to task this sort of faulty thinking by distinguishing Treatment effect vs Selection Effect:

 

Social scientists distinguish between what are known as treatment effects and selection effects. The Marine Corps, for instance, is largely a treatment-effect institution. It doesn’t have an enormous admissions office grading applicants along four separate dimensions of toughness and intelligence. It’s confident that the experience of undergoing Marine Corps basic training will turn you into a formidable soldier. A modelling agency, by contrast, is a selection-effect institution. You don’t become beautiful by signing up with an agency. You get signed up by an agency because you’re beautiful.

At the heart of the American obsession with the Ivy League is the belief that schools like Harvard provide the social and intellectual equivalent of Marine Corps basic training—that being taught by all those brilliant professors and meeting all those other motivated students and getting a degree with that powerful name on it will confer advantages that no local state university can provide. Fuelling the treatment-effect idea are studies showing that if you take two students with the same S.A.T. scores and grades, one of whom goes to a school like Harvard and one of whom goes to a less selective college, the Ivy Leaguer will make far more money ten or twenty years down the road.

Times Higher Education is suggesting that where you goes. But the research does not fully bear this out. Alan Krueger and Stacy Dale (1999) found that “students who attended more selective colleges do not earn more than other students who were accepted and rejected by comparable schools but attended less selective colleges.” Indeed a decade later, they revealed that it did not matter if you got into an elite school–if you had the numbers:“Even applying to a school, even if you get rejected, says a lot about you,” Mr. Krueger told me. He points out that the average SAT score at the most selective college students apply to turns out to be a better predictor of their earnings than the average SAT score at the college they attended. (The study measured a college’s selectivity by the average SAT score of admitted students as well as by a selectivity score that the publisher Barron’s gives to colleges.)”

A final word rom Kruger

 

My advice to students: Don’t believe that the only school worth attending is one that would not admit you. That you go to college is more important than where you go. Find a school whose academic strengths match your interests and that devotes resources to instruction in those fields. Recognize that your own motivation, ambition and talents will determine your success more than the college name on your diploma.

My advice to elite colleges: Recognize that the most disadvantaged students benefit most from your instruction. Set financial aid and admission policies accordingly.

 

 

 

And the top universities, according to Times Higher Education?

 

1 Harvard University US–31 degrees, 25 CEOs

2 University of Tokyo JAP–14 degrees, 13 CEOs 

3  Stanford University US 13 degrees, 11 CEOs

4  École Polytechnique FRA 12 degrees, 12 CEOs

5 HEC Paris FRA 10 degrees, 9 CEOs

6 ENA, École Nationale d’Administration FRA 9 degrees, 9 CEOs

7 University of Pennsylvania US 9 degrees, 8 CEOs

8 Massachusetts Institute of Technology US 9 degrees, 7 CEOs

9 Keio University JAP 8 degrees, 8 CEOs

10 Seoul National University KOR 8 degrees, 8 CEOs 

11 Cornell University US 8 degrees, 6 CEOs

12 INSEAD FRA 7 degrees, 7 CEOs

13 Tsinghua University CHN 7 degrees, 7 CEOs

14 University of Chicago US 7 degrees, 6 CEOs 

15 Northwestern University US 7 degrees, 6 CEOs