Category Archives: planning

The parent’s guide to college admission part 1

What role should the parent be playing in the college admission process? Willard Dix suggest parents “Become a mentor as much as a parent” in his excellent artcile “Ten Ways For Parents To Get On Top Of The College Admission Process” providing a short guide to what he means by mentoring:

This is the moment you can begin to step back from your authoritative role to become a mentor, “guiding without steering.” Instead of telling your student what to do, you start asking open-ended and non-directive questions like, “Tell me why you like that college?” or “How do you think that major will help you in the future?” Finding a good balance here can be difficult if you’re used to being more directive, but you’ll be surprised how positive transferring responsibility while offering help when needed can be.

He follows this up with 9 other excellent points from “expect complications” to “talk about hopes” and “don’t nag.”

I want to follow up more on the role a parent can play that moves applying to college from a transaction to its own journey into self and how parents can and sould be a guide for that journey. So expect a part 2. 

8 Mistakes teens make in applying to colleges

After having done this a long time, I notice students have a tendency to make certain mistakes. 

1) Mistake #1: Waiting to the Last Minute 

Fred Hargon, formerly of Princeton and Stanford, used to say that an application was not like a fine bottle of wine. It does not get better with age. Waiting to the last minute often creates stress for you and the people in your life. 

Julie Shimabukuro, Director of undergraduate admissions, Washington University in St. Louis  offers this insighte:

Many students who submit on the date of the deadline assume that everything transmitted and was received. But sometimes things are lost in cyberspace. By the time we process the thousands of pieces of information that come in on the final day, the actual deadline has come and gone, and it’s possible that something is still missing.

The best tool to help you? Your calendar. 

2)  Mistake #2: Not working with your counselor
Your counselors often know a lot about admissions, specific colleges and universities and you. Your hopes and dreams, interests, quirks and pet peaves. Moreover, in many cases they will be directly advocating for your admissions. So it is encumbent on you to ensure your counselor knows you. To that end, aim to check in every two weeks or so. 
3)  Mistake #3: Not applying deep
Personally I love workith with ambitious students. But the goal of college admission is to not just get in, but to thrive when you get there. To first part, getting in, you need some schools on your list at which you will be a star. Malcolm Gladwell has a strong opion about going to the place you can be the star. 

Work with your counselor to examine the specific selectivity of a college, especially as it relates to your school. Take advantage of visits to your campus. If a college is visiting, they are interested. 

And every college on your list ought to inspire you. 

4)  Mistake #4:Scratching the surface

If a collges has a supplimentary question, it matters. Often they want to know your specific motivation. As Eric J. Furda, admissions dean at the University of Pennsylvania, indicates:
“We wanted to know, why Penn? Did you submit a generic essay that was part of a school’s supplement—another school’s supplement? You may need to do a little bit more research before you hit the submit button. Take notes during the campus visit, and even if it isn’t your top choice, still understand that you need to speak to that school and show what you are going to contribute to that campus. Articulate why this school is for you. Students who do well will start citing faculty and programs they want to explore.”
Typically, the application offers specific, limited opportunities to share about you. Amy Jarich
UC Berkeley, offers this insight: 
In the application, the real estate is so valuable. Each part of it should be telling us something new … If you’ve told us in one essay how you live with your extended family and how important that is in your life, don’t tell us in the second essay about how the person you most admire is your grandmother … You want us to think: “That brings a new piece to this puzzle. I like that.” 
5)  Mistake #5: Well begun, half done
Just write it. Students overthnk the essays, and underwrite. Or more precisely, underedit. I have found using the pomodero method can greatly help in your productivity as an applicant. There are a few stages in the technique:
  1. Decide on the task to be done–write an essay or fill in the application. 
  2. Set the pomodoro timer (traditionally to 25 minutes).
  3. Work on the task until the timer rings. If a distraction pops into your head, write it down, but immediately get back on task.
  4. After the timer rings, put a checkmark on a piece of paper.
  5. If you are in the zone, continue on. If not, take a break (3-5 minutes–leave your desk)
  6. When you return do a different task with the same timer. 
  7. After you have 3 ticks, (ie you spent three pomoderos doing tasks, take a longer break (15–30 minutes), reset your checkmark count to zero, then go to step 1.
Learn more from the woman who originated it. Here is a free iphone timer
Using your calendar to set specific tasks each week is inspired. Keep it simple and you will feel more satisifed. 
Another part of the story to keep in mind: All admissions are conditional. SO aim to keep a storng year. Here are some tips to avoid senioritous. 

6)  Mistake #6: Missing the Details, details, details

Check deadlines directly with all your colleges.
Check all entry requirements and admission documents specifically with your university. 
Do both of these now. 
Proof-read all your applications. 
Have someone else profreed your applications. 

7)  Mistake #7: Not owning the process

Who is going to college? Yes, parents are paying and often know their teen well and thus should be involved, but as sounding board and coach. the student MUST take respoonsibility for all parts of the process from researching to applying. One idea I think works very well is a weekly meeting between student and mom and dad conducted in a business style. o it over lunch. Have to do lists. In between, avoid talking about college. The senior knows what needs to be done and needs space to do it. 
Here is a handy to avoid role confusion. 
8)  Mistake #8: Not looking after yourself
Most teens are going to really blow it with the following:
  • Not eating well
  • Not getting enough sleep
  • Not exercising
  • Not enjoying life
Technology is part of the issues, but it can also be part of the solution as I portray it in this article here. I am a big fan of also taking time every day to cultivate some stillness through mindfulness. My personal favorite is Smiling Mind, a free web platform and phone app. 

Hand tool

Often a lot of insight can be garned from documents like the common data set or a university’s strategic plan. Certainly you can google it, but some universities bury it it. I stumbled on this tool today from the Association of American University Date Exchange. “These are links to various resources at member institutions including the websites for the institution and IR office, course catalogs, factbooks, Common Data Set, organizational charts, and financial reports.”

“Go beyond school” Urges Woz

Steve Wozniak has sage advice for all people, but especially for teens. 

“But even in school, if you love something like mathematics, instead of working the assigned problems, do all the other ones too. Just decide, this is something I really love in life. I’m going to go a little further than school wants me to.”

And Mentors:

“They looked at things I could do and saw the things that I liked and wanted to do but were outside of the normal school,” he said. “Look for mentors that want to help you in other places in life and take advantage of it when you can. Don’t turn down something that’s given to you.”

Why the collegeboard’s new test date hurts international students

For years, Internationla counselors have advocated for the collegeboard to add a test date to the testing cycle. They did, only the wrong date. They decided that the March test date does not serve international kids. But instead they added an August test date…and took away the January test date starting in August 2017. 

Katherine Levin, a spokeswoman for the College Board, claims that the summer SAT will, “provide students with earlier opportunities to take the SAT before submitting college applications, and more time to focus on coursework, school activities, and college applications in the fall of their senior year.”

The Atlantic rightly asks “Who Benefits From the New Summer SAT?” and suggests other than the Collegeboard, students who do summer prep really benefits and of course the test prep companies. “But will it provide a similar advantage to low-income students, or could the summertime SAT end up widening the gap between rich and poor?”

2017-18 International SAT Administration Dates (Anticipated)
SAT Date SAT Subject Test Available?
Aug. 26, 2017 Yes
Oct. 7, 2017 Yes
Nov. 4, 2017 Yes
Dec. 2, 2017 Yes
May 5, 2018 Yes
June 2, 2018 Yes

Nancy Griesemer at the examiner weighs most of the issues out and concludes that “On balance, however, the late-August test date is a welcome move on the part of the College Board.” So far, no one has commented on how it impacts international students. Firstly, many international students take the SAT in January. Now they will have to wait until May, which often overlaps with the May Day long weekend and festivities. If a student takes the May test date they will have to register for the June Test before they have even sat the May test let alone gotten their scores. This will be compounded in the fall cycle. While certainly the summer test date allows kids coming from Prep (which they do a lot of) into the exam. But then, they will have to register for the October before they know the scores ect. Many international student actually do prep in December in anticipation of the January test date. 

 And many schools are actually not open in August overseas. While this may be true in the US, it is even more problemmatic overseas. And fo Chinese students, the August test date now adds another high price flight season as the Chinese student cannot test in China. In fairness, the January test often overlapped with Chinese New Year. 

The fact is, at least at my test center, the January test date has become a dominate one, ahead of December, November and on par of Spring test dates. Many international counselors actively supported and lobbied for adding the March test date and eliminating the January test date. Why are we not being listened to?


Commonapp essays remain the same

but almost half respond to the first prompt:

2016-2017 Essay Prompts 
1. Some students have a background, identity, interest, or talent that is so meaningful they believe their application would be incomplete without it. If this sounds like you, then please share your story.

 2. The lessons we take from failure can be fundamental to later success. Recount an incident or time when you experienced failure. How did it affect you, and what did you learn from the experience?

3. Reflect on a time when you challenged a belief or idea. What prompted you to act? Would you make the same decision again?

4. Describe a problem you’ve solved or a problem you’d like to solve. It can be an intellectual challenge, a research query, an ethical dilemma - anything that is of personal importance, no matter the scale. Explain its significance to you and what steps you took or could be taken to identify a solution.

5. Discuss an accomplishment or event, formal or informal, that marked your transition from childhood to adulthood within your culture, community, or family. 

You can create an account now to play around in it and it will roll over to next year. 

  • The student’s user name and Common App ID will all be preserved. This means they will be able to sign in to next year’s application system using the same email address they used this year.
  • All Common App data will be preserved.

Want to live on campus? Check out these colleges

FORBES TOP COLLEGE Dorm Capacity Frosh Soph Junior Senior
Cooper Union 21% X      
University of Texas, Austin 22%        
University of Washington 28%        
University of Wisconsin, Madison 31%        
University of California, Berkeley 34%        
University of Southern California 34% X X    
University of Florida 36% X      
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 39% X      
University of Virginia 44% X      
Jonhs Hopkins University 48% X X    
University of Notre Dame 50% X      
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 52% X X X X
Lehigh University 52% X X    
University of Maryland, College Park 52% X X    
University of Chicago 53% X X X X
Northwestern University 56% X      
Whitman College 56% X X X X
Santa Clara University 56%        
University of California, Los Angeles 57% X X X  
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 58% X      
Emory University 58% X X    
New York University 59% X X X X
Unviersity of Pennsylvania 65% X      
Macalester College 65% X X    
DePauw Unniversity 65% X X X X
Washington and Lee University 66% X X X  
University of Rochester 68% na na na na
Tufts University 68% X X    
Reed College 68% X      
Georgetown University 69% X X X  
Villanova University 69% X X X  
Carnegie Mellon University 71% X X X X
Rhodes College 72% X X    
Georgia Institute of Technology 73% X X    
Columbia University 76% X X X X
Colorado College 76% X X X X
College of William and Mary 77% X      
Occidental College 79% X X X  
Boston College 80% X X X  
Brandeis University 80% X X    
Boston University 80% X X X X
Grinnell College 81% na na na na
Brown University 81% X X X X
Vanderbilt University 81% X X X X
Wake Forest University 81% X X X X
Skidmore College 82% X X X X
Duke University 85% X X X X
Rice University 85% X      
Trinity University 86% X X X X
Bucknell University 87% X X X X
College of the Holy Cross 87% X X X X
Scripps College 87% X X X X
Dickinson College 87% X X X X
Dartmouth College 89% X X    
Claremont McKenna College 89% X      
Wheaton College 89% X X X X
Carleton College 91% X X X X
Barnard College 91% X X X X
Oberlin College 91% X X X X
Trinity College 91% X X X X
Yale University 92% X X X X
California Institute of Technology 92% X      
Williams College 93% X X X X
Davidson College 93% X X X X
Bates College 93% X X X X
Wofford College 93% X X X X
University of Richmond 93% X X   X
Swarthmore College 94% X X X X
Smith College 94% X X X X
Colgate University 95% X X X X
Lafayette College 95% X X X X
Bryn Mawr College 95% X      
Pomona College 96% X X X X
Connecticut College 96% X X X X
Bowdoin College 97% X X    
Vassar College 97% X X X X
Hamilton College 97% X X X X
Middlebury College 98% X X X X
Colby College 98% X X X X
Harvey Mudd College 98% X X X X
Franklin and Marshall College 98% X X X X
Sewanee–University of the South 98% X X X X
Cornell University 99% X X    
Denison University 99% X X X X
United States Military Academy 100% X X X X
Haverford College 100% X X X X
Wellesley College 100% X X X X
Wesleyan University 101% X X X X
Washington University in Saint Louis 101% X X X X
Centre College 101% X X X X
Mount Holyoke College 102% X X X X
United States Naval Academy 104% X X X X
Kenyon College 105% X X X X
Amherst College 106% X X X X
United States Air Force Academy 113% X X X X
Union College 117% X X X X
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 129% X X X X
Princeton University 131% X X X X
Stanford University 157% X X X X
Harvard University 178% X X X X
Sources: IPEDS, 

Published in Forbes

Entrepreneurship incubators in the form of colleges

Want to create your own business? Head to business correct? Hang on, not so fast, at least according to Linked In and the editors of Forbes Magazine. On their 2015 Americas most entrepreneurial colleges, only 2 speciality busines schools made the list. In fact, most of these colleges do not even offer a business program. To arrive at their rankings, Forbes “ranked the country’s most entrepreneurial schools based on the entrepreneurial ratios – the total number of alumni and students who have identified themselves as founders and business owners on LinkedIn, divided by the school’s student body (undergraduate and graduate combined).” They did the same for comprehsnive universities. I like their methodlogy as it focuses on what students actually do, rather than what the college says they do.I wish they provided the actual ratios so you could compare the university list with the college list. 

The granddaddy of Entrepreneurial rankings come from Entrepreneurial Magazine, a publication that should know a lot about starting a business. They outsource the porject to Princeton Review: “The survey asked school administrators 60 questions covering: their schools’ levels of commitment to entrepreneurship inside and outside the classroom, the percentage of faculty, students, and alumni actively and successfully involved in entrepreneurial endeavors, and the number and reach of their mentorship programs. The company also asked schools about their scholarships and grants for entrepreneurial studies, and their support for school-sponsored business plan competitions.” While their rankings seem to make sense when you look at it, in terms of academic preparation. But do they hold up to the real world test? Of the top 24 programs they ranked, only 8 made the rgade on Forbes/Linked in rankings that actually exmine who are entrepreneurs (at least say they are in their Linked-In Profile). 

How about another list, put out by College Choice? They have rather nebulous criteria: “Through an analysis of data from Crunchbase, Angel List, public business data, and other factors (such as proximity to major metropolitan entrepreneurial ecosystems), we have brought you a list of the 50 best colleges in the U.S. for aspiring entrepreneurs.” Comparing Collegechoice with Princeton Review/Entrepeurship Magazine we see a higher levelof cross over with 11 schools appear on both lists. Only 7 schools appear on all three lists. 

 

Princeton Reivew/Entrpreneurship

Forbes/linked in

College Choice

1. Babson College

 

33

2. University of Houston

 

 

3. Baylor University

 

50

4. Brigham Young University

17

32

5. University of Oklahoma

 

 

6. Syracuse University

41

48

7. Northeastern University

13

40

8. University of Southern California

28

5

9. Baruch College

 

 

10. Miami University

36

 

11. Temple University

 

 

12. Uni. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

41

13. University of Dayton

 

 

14. Clarkson University

 

 

15. DePaul University

 

 

16. Washington University in St. Louis

 

 

17. Lehigh University

44

 

18. University of Michigan

43

8

19. University of Washington

45

16

20. Texas Christian University

 

 

21. University of Maryland

29

20

22. University of Arizona

 

43

23. Saint Louis Univers

 

 

24. Bradley University

 

 

 

So which list should you believe? Like any ranking, the key lies in the methodology: One set of criteria will review different facets. Reading beneath the text, what you should be looking for are schools that:

  • Start up money to get you going (this may be in the form of a competition
  • Provide real world mentoring opportunities so you have someone who has been there/done that to bounce ideas off of
  • A club or group that gives you the kindred spirits to support you
  • A rigourous training in critical and original thinking and problem identification

Some examples:

  • Tufts University boasts an Entrepreneurial Leaderships Studies (ELS) program specifically for undergraduates. The Tufts Entrepreneurial Network keeps students connected to on-campus entrepreneurial activities as well as to alumni, and the Entrepreneurial Society sponsors several competitions, conferences, and networking opportunities.
  • the University of California Irvine is home to the Don Beall Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, which offers students opportunities to immerse themselves in a culture of innovation, ideas, and best practices. One of the most popular activities at the school is the annual Business Plan Competition, which offers over $100,000 in cash prizes for the most promising startup ideas. Merage offers a BA in Business Administration with several opportunities for specialization.
  • RPI has has eight Entrepreneurs in Residence, all successful business leaders.
  • At Middlebury, The four-week immersion program MiddCore has brought in over 40 entrepreneur mentors such as Peet’s Coffee and Tea CEO Dave Burwick.
  • Thanks to $1 million from alum and VC Michael Vlock, Hampshire is shelling out $200,000 a year to student ventures.

Where are you at with your entreneurial chops? Check out Gallup’s Entrepreneurial Strengthsfinder which rates you on the 10 talents of successful entrepreneurs:

  • Business Focus: You make decisions based on observed or anticipated effect on profit.
  • Confidence: You accurately know yourself and understand others.
  • Creative Thinker: You exhibit creativity in taking an existing idea or product and turning it into something better.
  • Delegator: You recognize that you cannot do everything and are willing to contemplate a shift in style and control.
  • Determination: You persevere through difficult, even seemingly insurmountable, obstacles.
  • Independent: You are prepared to do whatever needs to be done to build a successful venture.
  • Knowledge-Seeker: You constantly search for information that is relevant to growing your business.
  • Promoter: You are the best spokesperson for the business.
  • Relationship-Builder: You have high social awareness and an ability to build relationships that are beneficial for the firm’s survival and growth.
  • Risk-Taker: You instinctively know how to manage high-risk situations.

 

 

 

 

Colleges That Require the PROFILE Financial Aid Application

The Folks at DIY College Rankings have a useful list of colleges that reuqire the CSS Profile when appling for financial aid. 

Colleges That Require the PROFILE Financial Aid Application
(Download PDF version)

Colleges with binding early decision plans

Thanks to Cigus Vanni, counselor at Cherry Hill HS West (NJ/USA) for the annual update:

COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES IN THE UNITED STATES WITH BINDING EARLY DECISION ADMISSION PLANS

 [last modified July 23, 2015 at 1:15 PM]

ARIZONA

            Prescott College

 

CALIFORNIA

         Biola University [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

         California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo

            Claremont McKenna College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Harvey Mudd College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Occidental College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Pitzer College

            Pomona College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Santa Clara University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Scripps College [also supports an ED II plan]

            University of San Francisco [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

COLORADO

         Colorado College [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

 

CONNECTICUT

         Connecticut College [also supports an ED II plan]

         Fairfield University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Mitchell College

            Quinnipiac University

            Sacred Heart University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Trinity College [also supports an ED II plan]

            University of New Haven [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Wesleyan University [also supports an ED II plan]

 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

            American University [also supports an ED II plan]

            George Washington University [also supports an ED II plan]

 

FLORIDA

         Flagler College

            Florida Southern College

            Rollins College [also supports an ED II plan]

            University of Miami [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

GEORGIA

         Agnes Scott College [also supports an Early Action plan]

Emory University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Georgia Southwestern State University

            Morehouse College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Oxford College of Emory University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Spelman College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Wesleyan College [also supports an ED II plan]

           

ILLINOIS

            Lake Forest College [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

Moody Bible Institute

            Northwestern University

            Saint Francis Medical Center College of Nursing

            Trinity College of Nursing and Health Sciences

 

INDIANA

            DePauw University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Earlham College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Saint Mary’s College

            Wabash College [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

IOWA

            Cornell College [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

            Grinnell College [also supports an ED II plan]

 

KENTUCKY

            Centre College [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

            Georgetown College [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

MAINE

         Bates College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Bowdoin College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Colby College [also supports an ED II plan]

            College of the Atlantic [also supports an ED II plan]

            Maine Maritime Academy [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

MARYLAND

         Goucher College [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

            Johns Hopkins University

            Maryland Institute College of Art

Saint Mary’s College of Maryland [also supports an ED II plan]

Salisbury University [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

University of Baltimore

            Washington College [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

 

MASSACHUSETTS

         Amherst College

            Babson College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Bentley University

            Boston University

            Brandeis University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Clark University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            College of the Holy Cross

            Gordon College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Hampshire College [also supports an Early Acton plan and an ED II plan]

            Merrimack College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Mount Holyoke College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Northeastern University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Smith College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Springfield College

            Stonehill College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Tufts University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Wellesley College

            Wheaton College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Williams College

 

MICHIGAN

         Hillsdale College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Kalamazoo College [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

 

MINNESOTA

         Carleton College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Hamline University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Macalester College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Saint Olaf College [also supports an ED II plan]

 

MISSISSIPPI

            Mississippi College

 

MISSOURI

         Cox College

         Stephens College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Washington University in Saint Louis

 

NEBRASKA

            Nebraska Wesleyan University

 

NEW HAMPSHIRE

         Dartmouth College

 

NEW JERSEY

            Drew University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Ramapo College of New Jersey

            Stevens Institute of Technology [also supports an ED II plan]

            The College of New Jersey

 

NEW YORK

         Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

            Alfred University

            Barnard College

            Clarkson University

            Colgate University [also supports an ED II plan]

            College of New Rochelle

            Columbia University

            Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art

            Cornell University

            Elmira College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Eugene Lang College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Five Towns College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Hamilton College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Hartwick College

            Hobart and William Smith Colleges [also supports an ED II plan]

            Ithaca College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Jewish Theological Seminary of America [also supports an ED II plan]

            Manhattan College

            Maria College

            Marist College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Nazareth College [also supports an ED II plan]

            New York University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Polytechnic Institute of New York University

            Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [also supports an ED II plan]

            Rochester Institute of Technology

            Saint John Fisher College

            Saint Lawrence University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Sarah Lawrence College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Siena College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Skidmore College [also supports an ED II plan]

            State University of New York (SUNY) College at Buffalo

            SUNY College at Fredonia

            SUNY College at Geneseo

            SUNY College at Old Westbury

            SUNY College at Oswego

            SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

            SUNY Maritime College

            SUNY University at Buffalo

            Syracuse University

            Union College [also supports an ED II plan]

            University of Rochester

            Vassar College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Wagner College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Webb Institute of Naval Architecture

            Wells College [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

NORTH CAROLINA

            Davidson College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Duke University

         Elon University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            High Point University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Meredith College

            Piedmont International University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Wake Forest University

            Warren Wilson College [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

OHIO

            Case Western Reserve University [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

            Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science

            College of Wooster [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

            Denison University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Kenyon College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Miami University of Ohio [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Oberlin College and Conservatory [also supports an ED II plan]

            Ohio Wesleyan University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Wittenberg University [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

OREGON

         Lewis and Clark College [also supports an Early Action plan]

         Reed College [also supports an ED II plan]

 

PENNSYLVANIA

         Allegheny College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Bryn Mawr College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Bucknell University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Carnegie Mellon University [also supports an ED II plan]

         Dickinson College [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

Duquesne University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Franklin and Marshall College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Gettysburg College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Grove City College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Haverford College

            Juniata College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Lafayette College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Lebanon Valley College

            Lehigh University [also supports an ED II plan]

            Moravian College

            Muhlenberg College

            Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

            Susquehanna University [also supports a restrictive Early Action plan]

            Swarthmore College [also supports an ED II plan]

            University of Pennsylvania

            Ursinus College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Washington and Jefferson College [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

PUERTO RICO

         University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo

 

RHODE ISLAND

         Brown University

Bryant University [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

Providence College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Rhode Island School of Design

 

SOUTH CAROLINA

            Furman University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Presbyterian College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Wofford College [also supports an Early Action plan]

           

TENNESSEE

 

            Rhodes College [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

            University of The South [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

            Vanderbilt University [also supports an ED II plan]

 

TEXAS

         Rice University

            Southern Methodist University [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

            Texas Christian University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Trinity University [also supports an ED II plan and an Early Action plan]

           

VERMONT

         Bennington College [also supports an Early Action plan and an ED II plan]

            Champlain College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Marlboro College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Middlebury College [also supports an ED II plan]

            Sterling College [also supports an Early Action plan]

 

VIRGINIA

            Christopher Newport University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            College of William and Mary

            Hampden-Sydney College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Hollins University [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Lynchburg College

            Roanoke College

            University of Richmond [also supports an ED II plan]

            Virginia Military Institute

            Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

            Washington and Lee University [also supports an ED II plan]

           

WASHINGTON

         University of Puget Sound [also supports an ED II plan]

            Whitman College [also supports an ED II plan]

 

WISCONSIN

            Beloit College [also supports an Early Action plan]

            Lawrence University [also supports an Early Action plan] 

            This list was compiled by Cigus Vanni, longtime member of the New Jersey Association for College Admission Counseling Executive Board and former member of the NACAC Professional Development Committee (2007-2010).  Sources consulted included The College Handbook, 2016 by the College Board; individual college websites; the College Board Common Data Set; and various college admissions offices by telephone.  As is the case with all aspects of college admission, use lists as guides and be certain to double check with individual admissions offices