Category Archives: Personality

The parent’s guide to college admission part 1

What role should the parent be playing in the college admission process? Willard Dix suggest parents “Become a mentor as much as a parent” in his excellent artcile “Ten Ways For Parents To Get On Top Of The College Admission Process” providing a short guide to what he means by mentoring:

This is the moment you can begin to step back from your authoritative role to become a mentor, “guiding without steering.” Instead of telling your student what to do, you start asking open-ended and non-directive questions like, “Tell me why you like that college?” or “How do you think that major will help you in the future?” Finding a good balance here can be difficult if you’re used to being more directive, but you’ll be surprised how positive transferring responsibility while offering help when needed can be.

He follows this up with 9 other excellent points from “expect complications” to “talk about hopes” and “don’t nag.”

I want to follow up more on the role a parent can play that moves applying to college from a transaction to its own journey into self and how parents can and sould be a guide for that journey. So expect a part 2. 

Straight from the horse mouth

WHo shares insights straight from their admission officers and students?

  1. MIT Admission Blog–students and faculty. One of the oldest and still one of the best. 
  2. Tuft’s Inside Admissions
  3. Olin’s Admission Blog
  4. Babson’s Admission Blog
  5. Women who will blog–Wellesly
  6. Amherst admission blog
  7. Speaking of Princeton
  8. UPENN’s admission Blog
  9. SWATSTRUCK-Swarthmore
  10. Penn State’s admission blog
  11. Cornell University Admission Blog
  12. Access Juliard Blog
  13. Life at UB–SUNY Buffalo
  14. Oberlin admission blog
  15. Admissions @ Lawrence
  16. Siena’s Admission’s Blog
  17. UVA’s Notes from Peabody–one of the original’s and still one of the best
  18. William and Mary’s Admission Blog
  19. Marymount’s admission Blog
  20. Vanderbilt’s admission blog
  21. Georgia Tech’s admission Blog
  22. University of Georgia
  23. Rice Owl’s Admission Blog
  24. Tulane’s admission Blog
  25. University of Denver promises Real People, Real Stories
  26. Stanford’s admission blog
  27. Cal Berkeley’s Golden Bear Blog
  28. University of Southern California’s admission Blog
  29. Cal Tech’s As it happens
  30. Harvey Mudd admission Blog
  31. Pitzer unpeeled –perhaps the best named blog
  32. Whitman college admission blog
  33. University of Illinois’ admission Blog
  34. NorthWestern’s Admission Blog
  35. U Chicago’s uncommon admission blog
  36. Loyola Chicago’s Admission Blog
  37. DEpauw Admission blog
  38. U Michigan’s Admission Blog
  39. Kalamazoo’s admission blog
  40. Carelton’s admission blog
  41. Experience Iowa‘s admission blog
  42. Luther College Admission blog
  43. Univeirsity of Nore Dame’s admission Blog

Not specific to a university:

 

 

 

 

 

“Go beyond school” Urges Woz

Steve Wozniak has sage advice for all people, but especially for teens. 

“But even in school, if you love something like mathematics, instead of working the assigned problems, do all the other ones too. Just decide, this is something I really love in life. I’m going to go a little further than school wants me to.”

And Mentors:

“They looked at things I could do and saw the things that I liked and wanted to do but were outside of the normal school,” he said. “Look for mentors that want to help you in other places in life and take advantage of it when you can. Don’t turn down something that’s given to you.”

Self discovery

Below are various free self assessments. 
Personality
Strengths

Learning styles

Majors/Career inventories

 

ISTP Under Stress

ISTP Under Stress:

College application season can be stressful and you may discover aspect of yourself. Under minor stress, your blind spots will emerge; under profound stress, the shadow side can come out. Your shadow is essentially the opposite of your normal personality. According to In The Grip, ISTP follow the same stress patterns as INTP:

First signs of stress:

  • Becoming increasingly critical
  • Making cutting, sarcastic judgments with little data to support them
  • Losing their sharply honed focus

When stress takes over:

  • Passionately defending themselves and their perceptions
  • Becoming overly sensitive; may read negative intentions into innocuous interactions
  • Responding to and expressing strong emotions

Common stressors:

  • Strict rules, regulations, or supervision
  • Being confronted with strong emotions, especially personal criticisms
  • Illogical procedures or incompetent people

Coach Analyzers to deal with stress by helping them:

  • Recognize and confirm the stressful nature of the situation
  • Move out of situations before they become overly stressful
  • Focus on realities or ideas to help them see the situation more clearly
  • Take time alone to lower the intensity of their experience

 

Solution others should respect their physical and psychological space, lighten responsibilities, others should avoid asking them how they feel


According toTest on the Net, you might see the following:

Characteristics

 
  • Begins to lose their calm demeanour.

  • Attention to tasks and details dwindles, and relevant information is overlooked.

  • Feels increasingly fatigued and has trouble reaching sensible conclusions.

  • Confusion, anxiety and even panic can occur, but are often invisible to others.

  • Becomes impatient with people inattentive to details or who deny facts.

  • Becomes suspicious of other’s motives, fearing betrayal.

  • Statements grow terse, cold and hard.

  • May make uncharacteristic spur of the moment decisions.

  • May also come up with unrealistic, upbeat expectations in unfamiliar situations.

  • Resists change – anything unfamiliar becomes intolerable and consequences are seen as terrible.

  • Believes the stressful situation will continue forever, becoming even more overwhelmed and irritable.

 

Triggers

  • Feeling discounted, criticised, trivialised or not listened to.
  • Being around people expressing powerful emotions or frequent or ongoing crisis situations.
  • Not having the required amount of silence, solitude or space.
  • Feeling controlled or that they have limited choices or freedom.

 

Characteristics

  • Can lose their problem-solving abilities, self-confidence, and become socially awkward. 
  • May become slow, vague, distractible and dis-organised, forgetting and misplacing things. 
  • May feel numb, frozen or exhausted and unable to concentrate.
  • Becomes less articulate, rambles, speaks rapidly, sometimes using convoluted logic. 
  • Upset, anxiety or annoyances are expressed with very subtle body language such as a raised eyebrow, or distant look. 
  • Easily overreacts to the innocent remarks or body language of others, often misinterpreting them as personal slights or disapproval.
  • May feel exceedingly isolated from the world, unloved and unlovable.
  • Uncomfortable memories of being very different as a child and an outcast can be triggered.
  • They may become obstinate about applying logic, turning quite emotional about their method. 
  • Unsolvable problems are obsessively worked at anyway, even if they can’t be solved.
  • Emotional reactions such as frustration, anger or sadness can be swift, intense and surprising to themselves and others.

 

Gaining Equilibrium 

  • Engaging in challenging but mostly solitary physical activities like rock climbing.
  • Taking long walks in nature. 
  • Being alone, reading, playing solitaire or doing activities with repetitive handling.
  • Having others give them their space while keeping calm.
  • Letting others run errands and deal with the outside world for awhile.
  • Getting a reality check from a knowledgeable person.
  • Finding a new idea, insight or perspective in their situation.

Lessons
 

  • Accepting that life and people are sometimes just plain illogical.
  • Recognising and acknowledging their own vulnerability and the vulnerability of others.
  • Increasing their ability to safely express the depth of their feeling in the normal course of events.

 

 

 

More on the MBTI

Learn more about each personality type:
ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP
ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ

 

 

 

ISTJ Under Stress

ISTJ Under Stress:

College application season can be stressful and you may discover aspect of yourself. Under minor stress, your blind spots will emerge; under profound stress, the shadow side can come out. Your shadow is essentially the opposite of your normal personality. According to Test on the Net, you might see the following:

Triggers
  • Being surrounded by others who overlook the facts and realities of a situation.

  • When people try to convince them their Sensing evidence is wrong.

  • Unknown or unfamiliar activities and unexpected change.

  • Doing other’s assignments, long and hard work, feeling unappreciated or taken for granted.

Characteristics

 
  • Begins to lose their calm demeanour.

  • Attention to tasks and details dwindles, and relevant information is overlooked.

  • Feels increasingly fatigued and has trouble reaching sensible conclusions.

  • Confusion, anxiety and even panic can occur, but are often invisible to others.

  • Becomes impatient with people inattentive to details or who deny facts.

  • Becomes suspicious of other’s motives, fearing betrayal.

  • Statements grow terse, cold and hard.

  • May make uncharacteristic spur of the moment decisions.

  • May also come up with unrealistic, upbeat expectations in unfamiliar situations.

  • Resists change – anything unfamiliar becomes intolerable and consequences are seen as terrible.

  • Believes the stressful situation will continue forever, becoming even more overwhelmed and irritable.

Gaining Equilibrium


  • Physical exercise.

  • Getting out of their environment for a few days.

  • Being allowed to ‘hit bottom,’ playing out their fears and anxieties until complete.

  • Reminding themselves about what is real and that events will work out OK.

  • Being taken seriously and not judged as irrational.

  • Being listened to without advice being offered.

  • Unobtrusive help with overpowering details.  

Lessons

   
  • Learning to incorporate a more flexible view about details and responsibilities.

  • Realising that known past experience has relevance in unknown new situations.

  • Being more accepting of themselves plus other’s different viewpoints and lifestyles.

More on the MBTI

Learn more about each personality type:
ISTJ ISFJ INFJ INTJ
ISTP ISFP INFP INTP
ESTP ESFP ENFP ENTP
ESTJ ESFJ ENFJ ENTJ