Category Archives: Majors

Starting your College Research: Exploring the academics part 2

Continuing a deeper dive into a college’s academic, it is time to take a look at other parts of the academic experience. Your major, in US colleges, account for about 33% of your actually classes. In other countries it is up to 100%. What happens in the US? What do you do with the rest of the time? Cterainly you have room for electives–in some colleges, a lot f electives. You can trade some of your electives in for a minor or even another major. 

Many US colleges require you to take certain classes to meet graduation requirements. Called things like the core curriculum (thank you Columbia) or General Education Requirements, you need to look at what specifically you must take to graduate. Let us look at three examples:

Columbia University. 

Regardless of your major, all students will complete the core curriculum, known affectionally The Core, which inlcudes the Great Books:

 

  • Literature Humanities
  • Contemporary Civilization
  • University Writing
  • Art Humanities
  • Music Humanities
  • Frontiers of Science

You also have to fufill some other requirements:

 

  • Science Requirement–Three courses bearing at least 3 points each (for a total of at least 10 points) must be completed to meet this portion of the Core Curriculum. 
  • Global Core Requirement–Students must complete two courses from the approved list of Global Core courses for a letter grade.
  • Foreign Language Requirement
  • Physical Education Requirement

Duke University

To graduate students must successfully complete two courses in each of five areas of knowledge:

 

  1. Arts, Literatures, and Performance (ALP) Courses focus on the analysis and interpretation of the creative products of the human intellect, and/or engage students in creative performance requiring intellectual understanding and interpretive skills.
  2. Civilizations (CZ) Courses focus on the analysis and evaluation of ideas and events that shape civilizations past and present.
  3. Natural Sciences (NS) Courses focus on the interpretation or interpretation of scientific theories or models of the natural world.
  4. Quantitative Studies (QS) Courses provide instruction in a quantitative skill to achieve proficiency in math, statistics, or computer science, or engage in the application of explicitly quantitative methodology to analyze problems.? NOTE: one of the two required courses must be taken in Math, Statistics, or Computer Science.
  5. Social Sciences (SS) Courses focus on the causes of human behavior and the origins and functions of the social structures in which we operate.

 

While there are robust offerings in each area. But it goes beyond just the areas of knowledge. To graduate students must successfully complete two courses (or 1-3 in a foreign language and 3 in writing) in each of six modes of inquiry.

The first three Modes of Inquiry address important cross-cutting themes that transcend individual disciplines and may be approached from various disciplinary perspectives. Students need to be prepared to grapple with issues pertaining to these themes throughout their lives and careers.

  • Cross-Cultural Inquiry (CCI). ?This Mode of Inquiry provides an academic engagement with the dynamics and interactions of culture(s) in a comparative or analytic perspective. It involves a scholarly, comparative, and integrative study of political, economic, aesthetic, social and cultural differences. It seeks to provide students with the tools to identify culture and cultural difference across time or place, between or within national boundaries. This includes but is not limited to the interplay between and among material circumstances, political economies, scientific understandings, social and aesthetic representations, and the relations between difference/diversity and power and privilege within and across societies. In fulfilling this requirement, students are encouraged to undertake comparisons that extend beyond national boundaries and their own national cultures and to explore the impact of increasing globalization.
  • Ethical Inquiry (EI). ?Undergraduate education is a formative period for engaging in critical analysis of ethical questions arising in human life. Students need to be able to assess critically the consequences of actions, both individual and social, and to sharpen their understanding of the ethical and political implications of public and personal decision-making. Thus, they need to develop and apply skills in ethical reasoning and to gain an understanding of a variety of ways in which, across time and place, ethical issues and values frame and shape human conduct and ways of life.
  • Science, Technology, and Society (STS). ?Advances in science and technology have wrought profound changes in the structure of society in the modern era. They have fundamentally changed the world, both its philosophical foundations, as in the Copernican or Darwinian revolutions, and in its practical everyday experience, as in the rise of the automobile and television. In the second half of the last century, the pace of such change accelerated dramatically; science and technology will play an even greater role in shaping the society of the future. If students are to be prepared to analyze and evaluate the scientific and technological issues that will confront them and to understand the world around them, they need exposure to basic scientific concepts and to the processes by which scientific and technological advances are made and incorporated into society. They need to understand the interplay between science, technology, and society-that is, not only how science and technology have influenced the direction and development of society, but also how the needs of society have influenced the direction of science and technology.
  • Foreign Language (FL). ?Duke has set internationalization as an institutional priority in order to prepare students to live in an increasingly diverse and interdependent world. By developing proficiency in a foreign language, students can develop cross-cultural competency and become more successful members of their increasingly complex local, national, and international communities. Foreign language study substantially broadens students’ own experiences and helps them develop their intellect and gain respect for other peoples. Students need an awareness of how language frames and structures understanding and effective communication, and a study of foreign language improves students’ native language skills.
  • Writing (W). ?Effective writing is central to both learning and communication. To function successfully in the world, students need to be able to write clearly and effectively. To accomplish this, they need to have a sustained engagement with writing throughout their undergraduate career. Thus, students must take at least three writing courses at Duke: a) Writing 101 in their first year and b) two writing-intensive courses (W) in the disciplines, at least one of which must be taken after their first year. Through the latter type of courses students become familiar with the various modes and genres of writing used within an academic discipline and learn how the conventions and expectations for writing differ among the disciplines.
  • Research (R). ?As a research university, Duke seeks to connect undergraduate education to the broad continuum of scholarship reflected in its faculty. Such a rich setting provides students with opportunities to become involved in a community of learning and to engage in the process of discovery and move beyond being the passive recipients of knowledge that is transmitted to being an active participant in the discovery, critical evaluation, and application of knowledge and understanding. Engagement in research develops in students an understanding of the process by which new knowledge is created, organized, accessed, and synthesized. It also fosters a capacity for the critical evaluation of knowledge and the methods of discovery. This is important not only for undergraduates who wish to pursue further study at the graduate level, but also for those who seek employment in a rapidly changing and competitive marketplace.

And still more:

 

  • First-year writing. Students must successfully complete Writing 101 in fall or spring of your first year. If they do not, they must enroll again during the summer (if offered) or the fall of sophomore year. Failure to do so can result in academic withdrawal for two semesters.
  • First-year seminar. During their first year, students must successfully complete a seminar (usually designated with an “S” after the course number). Participation in the Focus Program, the 89S seminar series (open to first-year students only), the 80S seminar series, or any seminar for which students qualify fulfills this requirement. If students do not take a seminar in their first two semesters, they must do so during summer session I or II. Failure to do so can result in academic withdrawal for two semesters.
  • Small Group Learning Experiences (SGLE). Students must complete two SGLEs – seminars, tutorials, thesis courses, and independent study courses – after their first year.

Brown University

Unlike the other Two, Brown subscribes to an Open Curriculum:

Brown’s Open Curriculum is based on three principles. The first is that students ought to take an active role in their education by assuming responsibility for the direction of their learning. Secondly, an undergraduate education is seen as a process of individual and intellectual development, rather than simply a way to transmit a set body of information. Finally, the curriculum should encourage individuality, experimentation, and the integration and synthesis of different disciplines.

While you will have requirements in your major, the only other thing you have to do is demonstrate “excellent skill in written English before they graduate.”

 

Each approach can have its advantages. Some will prefer a more freedom, others will want more direction. Some want choice. As you explore your options on your major possibilities, dig into what the university requires of you while you are there. As you explore this aspect, check on student’s experiecnes themselves through websites like Unigo and Niche

Brown, according to Niche:

 

What Students Say About Professors

POLL
88%
of students say professors are passionate about the topics they teach.52 responses
POLL
90%
of students say professors care about their students’ success.52 responses
POLL
87%
of students say professors are engaging and easy to understand.52 responses
POLL
92%
of students agree professors are approachable and helpful when needed.52 responses

 

Duke

 

What Students Say About Professors

POLL
92%
of students say professors are passionate about the topics they teach.65 responses
POLL
85%
of students say professors care about their students’ success.65 responses
POLL
86%
of students say professors are engaging and easy to understand.65 responses
POLL
88%
of students agree professors are approachable and helpful when needed.65 responses
Columbia

What Students Say About Professors

POLL
91%
of students say professors are passionate about the topics they teach.92 responses
POLL
77%
of students say professors care about their students’ success.91 responses
POLL
77%
of students say professors are engaging and easy to understand.91 responses
POLL
76%
of students agree professors are approachable and helpful when needed.91 responses

 

Be sure to read the reviews, both at Niche and Unigo:

Duke, for example, is called her experience awesome: “I have taken three large lecture classes: Econ 51, Psych 11 and Compsci 82. Otherwise, almost every other class I have taken has had 16 or fewer students. I am an English major with a concentration in history, documentary and visual and media studies. My professors not only know my name by the end of the semester, but they know my goals and interests. From a practical perspective, this makes networking easy. Yet it makes for a much more meaningful classroom experience, as well. Class participation is expected and often encourages discussion outside of class.”

Brown also receives rave reviews for its academics: “Do professors know your name? In most classes yes · Tell us about your favorite class. I’ve had many! One is “Hispanics in the US”, where other than the readings and class discussions we each volunteer every week at a local public school and tutor, usually in Spanish. During spring break some of us also participated in a Brown community service project that takes volunteers to a clinic in the Dominican Republic · How often do students study? Depends on the student. But you can find a lot of people in the library on a Sat night. Kinda scary · Is class participation common? Yes, everyone loves to hear themselves speak · Do Brown students have intellectual conversations outside of class? Yes · Are students competitive? I don’t think so. Everyone just has high standards for themselves · Do you spend time with professors outside of class? I was invited to two holiday dinners with professors, and one professor in a class I took last semester, took 5 students to dinner at a restaurant after class every week.”

As does Columbia, although some do take exception of the workload:  ”As I said before, the courseload is beyond ridiculous. The amount of reading is mindblowing and I am sure most of the professors could not even do it. Ya they could probably finish the readings for their individual class. But if they took an entire semester worth of classes and tried to keep up on the readings in every class simultaneously they would realize they are completely out of line with what they assign.”

 

Don’t become a doctor…so argues a doctor

in a rather compelling essay in Business Insider; he argues that

the training time is disporption to

  • the cost
  • and debt
  • and satisfaction

 

While the liberal arts rock, if you gain these skills, you will roll into the job market

While politicians decry the neccesity of the liberal arts, many business leaders see the inherint value in the soft skill development embedded within their approach. 
But developing those skills only gets you so far. Want to be more competitive for the job market and be rewarded for it? Add at least one of the skills sets from below:

How much is your major worth?

Sadly this question always is answered in terms of money, not value, as in human value. Has your college degree made you a better person? Does your degree enable you contribute meaningfully to society? Do you live a lifestyle consistent with your values? If none of those are important to you, than this graph is for you:

 

 

This according to pay scale.

““People without a liberal-arts background really have no place to go with their skill sets,”

so explains the head of the CIA. Not that CIA, but rather the Culinary Institute of America. I had never really thought about the CIA as being a liberal arts institution. Afterall, its mission states

 

The Culinary Institute of America (CIA) is a private, not-for-profit college dedicated to providing the world’s best professional culinary education.

Excellence, leadership, professionalism, ethics, and respect for diversity are the core values that guide our efforts.

We teach our students the general knowledge and specific skills necessary to live successful lives and to grow into positions of influence and leadership in their chosen profession.

No real mention of a liberal education beyond the most cursory “General knowledge” statement. They offer 4 Bachelor and 3 assoicate degrees in their upstate New York Campus. So what do they actual expect? Roughly 40% of the upper class requirements are firmly in the liberal arts:

 

 

  • Liberal Arts Requirements (24 Credits)

COURSE CREDITS
Anthropology of Food or Psychology of Human Behavior or Social Psychology 3 credits
Calculus I or College Algebra or Introduction to Statistics or Science Fundamentals or Survey of Mathematics 3 credits
Foreign Language 6 credits
History and Cultures of Asia or History and Cultures of Europe or History and Cultures of the Americas 6 credits
Literature and Composition 3 credits
Principles of Macroeconomics or Principles of Microeconomics 3 credits

  • Liberal Arts Elective (3 Credits)

COURSE CREDITS
Select from liberal arts courses listed on CIA Main Menu (the student web portal).

  • Business Management Requirements (15 Credits)

COURSE CREDITS
Finance or Managerial Accounting 3 credits
Financial Accounting 3 credits
Foodservice Management 3 credits
Human Resource Management 3 credits
Marketing and Promoting Food 3 credits

  • Business Management Electives (9 Credits)

COURSE CREDITS
Select from business management courses listed on CIA Main Menu (the student web portal).

  • Advanced Concepts Requirement (3 Credits)

COURSE CREDITS
Advanced Cooking or Advanced Principles of Service Management in Hospitality or Menu Development and Testing 3 credits

  • Free Electives (9 Credits)

COURSE CREDITS
Select from elective courses listed on CIA Main Menu (the student web portal).

  • Total Credits: 63 (Junior/Senior Years)

    TOTAL CREDITS, ASSOCIATE & BACHELOR’S DEGREE: 132

    Please note:
    • The foreign language requirement must be fulfilled by the end of the junior year.
    • Not all electives will be offered each semester. For the most current list of elective offerings, students should check CIA Main Menu (the student web portal).
    • The Global Cuisines and Cultures elective travel courses take place between bachelor’s semesters in late April/early May and late July/early August.
    • Course prerequisites and corequisites are listed in the course descriptions.

     

  •  
  •  

     

  • Carolina Gomez, CIA culinary arts alumni, is co-owner, Three Little Pigs Charcuterie & Salumi.

    Spotlight On:Carolina GomezBachelor’s Degree in Culinary Arts Management

    Students often make valuable connections at The Culinary Institute of America, and that was especially true for Carolina Gomez. That’s where she met fellow student Jason Story ’11, who would not only become her husband, but her business partner as well.

     

- See more at: http://www.ciachef.edu/culinary-arts-bachelors-degree-program-ny/#sthash.dmU9T0Ub.dpuf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certainly, you can more readily see the liberal arts embedded in Westpoint’s mission:

“To educate, train, and inspire the Corps of Cadets so that each graduate is a commissioned leader of character committed to the values of Duty, Honor, Country and prepared for a career of professional excellence and service to the Nation as an officer in the United States Army.”

The US Military Academy, as another instituion profiled in the same article, articulates strongly for the liberal arts: “It’s important to develop in young people the ability to think broadly, to operate in the context of other societies and become agile and adaptive thinkers,” Trainor said. “What you’re trying to do is teach them to deal with complexity, diversity, and change. They’re having to deal with people from other cultures. They have to think very intuitively to solve problems on the ground.”

So what does Westpoint expect?

Alll Cadets will complete 26 units in a common core:

Chemistry

  • CH101 General Chemistry I 
  • CH102 General Chemistry II

Alternative sequence:

  • CH151 Advanced General Chemistry I
  • CH152 Advanced General Chemistry II

Computer Science/Information Technology 

  • IT105 Introduction to Computing and Information Technology
  • IT305 Theory and Practice of Military Information Technology Systems

Alternative course:

  • IT155 Advanced Placement Introduction to Computing and Information Technology
  • IT355 Advanced Theory and Practice of Military Information Technology Systems

Economics

  • SS201 Economics: Principles and Problems

Alternative course:

  • SS251 Advanced Economics: Principles and Problems

English

  • EN101 Composition
  • EN302 Advanced Composition through Culture

Foreign Language

  • Two courses required; sequence determined by the Department of Foreign Languages

History

Choice of two sequences:

  • HI105 History of the United States
  • HI108 Regional Studies in World History

or

  • HI107 Western Civilization
  • HI108 Regional Studies in World History

Alternative sequences:

  • HI155 Advanced History of the United States
  • HI158 Advanced Regional Studies in World History

or

  • HI157 Advanced History of Western Civilization
  • HI158 Advanced Regional Studies in World History

International Relations

  • SS307 International Relations

Alternative course:

  • SS357 Advanced International Relations

Law

  • LW403 Constitutional and Military Law

Leadership

  • PL100 General Psychology
  • PL300 Military Leadership

Alternative sequence:

  • PL150 Advanced General Psychology
  • PL350 Advanced Military Leadership

Literature

  • EN102 Literature

Mathematics

  • MA103 Mathematical Modeling and Intro to Calculus
  • MA104 Calculus I
  • MA205 Calculus II
  • MA206 Probability and Statistics

Alternative sequence, MA104 validated:

  • MA153 Advanced Multivariable Calculus
  • MA255 Mathematical Modeling and Introduction to Differential Equations
  • MA206 Probability and Statistics
  • MA100/MA101 may be required in lieu of MA103.

Military History

  • HI301 History of the Military Art
  • HI302 History of the Military Art

Alternative sequence:

  • HI351 Advanced History of the Military Art
  • HI352 Advanced History of the Military Art

Philosophy

  • PY201 Philosophy

Physical Geography 

  • EV203 Physical Geography

Physics

  • PH201 Physics I
  • PH202 Physics II

Alternative sequence:

  • PH251 Advanced Physics I
  • PH252 Advanced Physics II

Political Science

  • SS202 American Politics

Alternative course:

  • SS252 Advanced American Politics

It is interesting that two schools with very specific career preparation ambitions emphsise the well-rounded thinker in their process of education. The article also mentions art schools like SCAD and engineering speciality schools like WPI giving a sense of how important this approach is. 

 

The growing cluelessness of of business insider rankings

WIth ranking seasons well underway, Business Insider is carrying a series of “best colleges for…”. I read with both interest and trepidation. Take the latest article, best colleges for working in finance, which distills the colective wisdom from 1000 business insider readers. They come up with this obvious piece of advice: 54% say study busines sif you want a succcesful career in finance. Except they contradict themselves by creating a list of colleges that really do not have much focus on business. In fact, of the top 10 colleges on their list, only one, Upenn, offers a degree in business. Cornell offers Hospitality Management and Applied Economics Management, which I guess you could argue is basically the same thing. Of the second ten, 6 offer business, and one has a certificate of business. 

Still it does make you wonder. Even more so when you compare with Linked In which actually analyzes peoples job titles in their profiles to determined the colleges that produce financers. 

 

University

Linked in Ranking

Business Insider ranking

University of Pennsylvania

1

9

Yale University

2

2

Georgetown University

3

11

Princeton University

4

6

Columbia University

5

7

New York University

6

15

Duke University

7

4

Harvard University

8

1

Cornell University

9

10

Dartmouth College

10

8

University of Notre Dame

11

21

Wake Forest University

12

NR

Villanova University

13

NR

Boston College

14

19

Wellesley College

15

NR

Amherst College

16

23

Brown University

17

23

Lehigh University

18

NR

Rice University

19

NR

Carnegie Mellon University

20

NR

 

Entrepreneurship incubators in the form of colleges

Want to create your own business? Head to business correct? Hang on, not so fast, at least according to Linked In and the editors of Forbes Magazine. On their 2015 Americas most entrepreneurial colleges, only 2 speciality busines schools made the list. In fact, most of these colleges do not even offer a business program. To arrive at their rankings, Forbes “ranked the country’s most entrepreneurial schools based on the entrepreneurial ratios – the total number of alumni and students who have identified themselves as founders and business owners on LinkedIn, divided by the school’s student body (undergraduate and graduate combined).” They did the same for comprehsnive universities. I like their methodlogy as it focuses on what students actually do, rather than what the college says they do.I wish they provided the actual ratios so you could compare the university list with the college list. 

The granddaddy of Entrepreneurial rankings come from Entrepreneurial Magazine, a publication that should know a lot about starting a business. They outsource the porject to Princeton Review: “The survey asked school administrators 60 questions covering: their schools’ levels of commitment to entrepreneurship inside and outside the classroom, the percentage of faculty, students, and alumni actively and successfully involved in entrepreneurial endeavors, and the number and reach of their mentorship programs. The company also asked schools about their scholarships and grants for entrepreneurial studies, and their support for school-sponsored business plan competitions.” While their rankings seem to make sense when you look at it, in terms of academic preparation. But do they hold up to the real world test? Of the top 24 programs they ranked, only 8 made the rgade on Forbes/Linked in rankings that actually exmine who are entrepreneurs (at least say they are in their Linked-In Profile). 

How about another list, put out by College Choice? They have rather nebulous criteria: “Through an analysis of data from Crunchbase, Angel List, public business data, and other factors (such as proximity to major metropolitan entrepreneurial ecosystems), we have brought you a list of the 50 best colleges in the U.S. for aspiring entrepreneurs.” Comparing Collegechoice with Princeton Review/Entrepeurship Magazine we see a higher levelof cross over with 11 schools appear on both lists. Only 7 schools appear on all three lists. 

 

Princeton Reivew/Entrpreneurship

Forbes/linked in

College Choice

1. Babson College

 

33

2. University of Houston

 

 

3. Baylor University

 

50

4. Brigham Young University

17

32

5. University of Oklahoma

 

 

6. Syracuse University

41

48

7. Northeastern University

13

40

8. University of Southern California

28

5

9. Baruch College

 

 

10. Miami University

36

 

11. Temple University

 

 

12. Uni. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

41

13. University of Dayton

 

 

14. Clarkson University

 

 

15. DePaul University

 

 

16. Washington University in St. Louis

 

 

17. Lehigh University

44

 

18. University of Michigan

43

8

19. University of Washington

45

16

20. Texas Christian University

 

 

21. University of Maryland

29

20

22. University of Arizona

 

43

23. Saint Louis Univers

 

 

24. Bradley University

 

 

 

So which list should you believe? Like any ranking, the key lies in the methodology: One set of criteria will review different facets. Reading beneath the text, what you should be looking for are schools that:

  • Start up money to get you going (this may be in the form of a competition
  • Provide real world mentoring opportunities so you have someone who has been there/done that to bounce ideas off of
  • A club or group that gives you the kindred spirits to support you
  • A rigourous training in critical and original thinking and problem identification

Some examples:

  • Tufts University boasts an Entrepreneurial Leaderships Studies (ELS) program specifically for undergraduates. The Tufts Entrepreneurial Network keeps students connected to on-campus entrepreneurial activities as well as to alumni, and the Entrepreneurial Society sponsors several competitions, conferences, and networking opportunities.
  • the University of California Irvine is home to the Don Beall Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, which offers students opportunities to immerse themselves in a culture of innovation, ideas, and best practices. One of the most popular activities at the school is the annual Business Plan Competition, which offers over $100,000 in cash prizes for the most promising startup ideas. Merage offers a BA in Business Administration with several opportunities for specialization.
  • RPI has has eight Entrepreneurs in Residence, all successful business leaders.
  • At Middlebury, The four-week immersion program MiddCore has brought in over 40 entrepreneur mentors such as Peet’s Coffee and Tea CEO Dave Burwick.
  • Thanks to $1 million from alum and VC Michael Vlock, Hampshire is shelling out $200,000 a year to student ventures.

Where are you at with your entreneurial chops? Check out Gallup’s Entrepreneurial Strengthsfinder which rates you on the 10 talents of successful entrepreneurs:

  • Business Focus: You make decisions based on observed or anticipated effect on profit.
  • Confidence: You accurately know yourself and understand others.
  • Creative Thinker: You exhibit creativity in taking an existing idea or product and turning it into something better.
  • Delegator: You recognize that you cannot do everything and are willing to contemplate a shift in style and control.
  • Determination: You persevere through difficult, even seemingly insurmountable, obstacles.
  • Independent: You are prepared to do whatever needs to be done to build a successful venture.
  • Knowledge-Seeker: You constantly search for information that is relevant to growing your business.
  • Promoter: You are the best spokesperson for the business.
  • Relationship-Builder: You have high social awareness and an ability to build relationships that are beneficial for the firm’s survival and growth.
  • Risk-Taker: You instinctively know how to manage high-risk situations.

 

 

 

 

Linked in now ranking out

Linked-in is jumping into the rankings game (again):

  1. First, we identified the top companies where software developers are choosing to work.
  2. Next, we found people on LinkedIn who work as software developersand saw where they went to school.
  3. Finally, for each school, we found the percentage of these alumni who’ve landed software development jobs at these top companies, then compared the percentages to come up with the list.

So, if you care about outcomes the Linked-In Rankings may be just the thing you need. Given that Linked=In is the Go To Network for professionals, it is an interesting place to datamine

Huge samples and granular details make the new rankings interesting, Schneider said, whether or not they really take off as a consumer guide to college.

“They’re getting smart about how to tap into this big database,” he said of LinkedIn. “This is big data.”

Taking a closer look at one ranking, the accounting, we can guage how it compares to other well known rankings:

 

 

Linked-In

USNEWS

Business

week

Acct

report

Super ranking

Villanova University

1

 

 

 

 

University of Notre Dame

2

4

2

5

3

Boston College

3

 

 

 

 

Lehigh University

4

 

 

 

 

Emory University

5

 

 

 

 

University of Southern California

6

5

 

6

7

Fairfield University

7

 

 

 

 

Santa Clara University

8

 

 

 

 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

9

2

5

2

2

Wake Forest University

10

 

9

 

8

Only two colleges appear on all lists: The fighting Irish and the mighty Illini. The Linked in one does raise eyebrows because so many of the schools do NOT appear on other lists.  

Super ranking: http://www.accounting-degree.org/best-accounting-schools/

#1. Brigham Young University, Marriott School of Management

#2. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign College of Business

#3. The University of Notre Dame, Mendoza College of Business

#4. University of Texas at Austin, McCombs Schools of Business

#5. Indiana University, Kelley School of Business

#6. University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School

#7. University of Southern California, Marshall School of Business

#8. Wake Forest University School of Business

#9. University of Washington, Foster School of Business

#10. University of Georgia, Terry College of Business

#11. Texas A&M University, Mays Business School

#12. University of Virginia, McIntire School of Commerce

#13. Michigan State University, Broad College of Business

#14. New York University, Stern School of Business

#15. Bentley University
#16. Arizona State University, W.P. Carey School of Business

#17. University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Business

#18. Penn State University, Smeal College of Business

#19. Ohio State University, Fisher College of Business

#20. University of Florida, Warrington College of Business Administration

#21. University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, Ross School of Business

#22. University of California, Berkeley, Haas School of Business

#23. Cornell University, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management
#24. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler School of Business

#25. Southern Methodist University, Cox School of Business

#26. University of Missouri, Trulaske College of Business

#27. Boston College, Carroll School of Management

#28. Miami University-Ohio, Farmer School of Business

#29. Northern Illinois University College of Business

#30. University of Tennessee College of Business Administration

 

 

 

Public accounting report ranking

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/news/documents/PARSurvey2013-BaruchRankings.pdf

1 1 University of Texas

2 2 University of Illinois

3 3 Brigham Young University

4 9 University of Mississippi

5 5 Notre Dame University

6 4 University of Southern California

7 10 Texas A&M University

8 6 Indiana University

9 8 University of Florida

10 7 The Ohio State University

 

Bloomberg Businessweek

1.

Brigham Young (Marriott)

1.067

2.

Notre Dame (Mendoza)

1.076

3.

UC Berkeley (Haas)

1.081

4.

Cornell (Dyson)

1.089

5.

Illinois – Urbana-Champaign

1.116

6.

Tulsa (Collins)

1.118

7.

Richmond (Robins)

1.119

8.

Southern Methodist (Cox)

1.12

9.

Wake Forest

1.138

10.

Tulane (Freeman)

1.141

 

 

USNEWS

#1 University of Texas—?Austin

#2 University of Illinois—?Urbana-?Champaign

#3Brigham Young University—?Provo

#4 University of Notre Dame

#5 University of Pennsylvania

#5 University of Southern California

#7 University of Michigan—?Ann Arbor

#8 Indiana University Blommington

#9 New York University

#10 Ohio State University—?Columbus

 

 

Absolutely asinine ranking

Rankings are the bane of most college counselors existance. Most of us understand why people use them, but wish more people would look under the hood at the methodology or at least take a closer look with a healthy dose of skeptism. Unofrtunately, when major news outlets like USA Today publish nonse like this top 10 business schools, we have moved further away from the informed consumer. Partnering with College Factual, USA Today aims to provide  ”a list of the top 10 U.S. business schools to help you narrow down your college search — the first step to possibly becoming the next Warren Buffett (who studied at the University of Pennsylvania, among others).”  The only problem? The list is full of nonsense. 

 

USA Today/College Factual

1. University of Pennsylvania

2. Bentley University

3. University of California-Berkeley

4. United States Military Academy

5. United States Air Force Academy

6. Georgetown University

7. University of Southern California

8. Bucknell University

9. Washington and Lee University.

10. Bryant University

Niether the airforce academy nor Westpoint offer business. Berkeley offers a wonderful business program but it does not start until thrid year. Consider their list compared against USNEWS and Business week:

 

USA Today/College Factual

Business Week

US News

1. University of Pennsylvania

University of Notre Dame

Mendoza College of Business

University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, PA

 

2. Bentley University

University of Virginia

McIntire School of Commerce

#2

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Cambridge, MA

#2

University of California–Berkeley

Berkeley, CA

#2

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Ann Arbor, MI

3. University of California-Berkeley

Cornell University

Dyson School of Applied Economics & Management

 

4. United States Military Academy

Boston College

Carroll School of Management

 

5. United States Air Force Academy

Washington University, St. Louis

Olin Business School

#5

New York University

New York, NY

#5

University of Virginia

Charlottesville, VA

#7

University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, NC

6. Georgetown University

University of Texas, Austin

McCombs School of Business

 

7. University of Southern California

University of Pennsylvania

The Wharton School

 

8. Bucknell University

Indiana University

Kelley School of Business

#8

Carnegie Mellon University

Pittsburgh, PA

#8

University of Texas–Austin

Austin, TX

 

9. Washington and Lee University.

Emory University

Goizueta Business School

 

10. Bryant University

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Kenan-Flagler Business School

#10

Cornell University

Ithaca, NY

#10

Indiana University–Bloomington

Bloomington, IN

#10

University of Notre Dame

Notre

 

What can you do with a major in…?

Theoretically lots. Over half of all college graduates report working in a field not related to their major. Now Ben Schmidt has data mined the American Community survey to visual represent majors to jobs. The graph is very busy, but you can click on a specific major or job and get that pathway specifically. Here is the one from Mechanical Engineering majors: