Category Archives: Careers

Starting your College Research: Career development

As discussed many times in this blog, your major may not matter as much as you think. That said, a growing number of people want a career outcome of going to college. If you look at historical trends as to why a student chooses a particular university you will see that what resonates with the students has grown:

  • This college’s graduates gain admission to top graduate/professional schools in 2005: 27.1% rated this as very important. In 2015: 33.7%
  • This college’s graduates get good jobs in 2005: 47.4% rated it as very important. In 2015: 57.9%

Contrary to what people think, Business may not be as prevelent as people think:

Interest in business as a probable field of study peaked in 1987 when more than one-quarter (25.7%) of students intended to major in a business-related field. By 1995, interest in majoring in business had fallen to 15.5% of incoming college students. After a slight recovery in the early years of the 21st century, students’ interest in business as a prob- able field of study fell to 13.5% in 2015, its lowest point since 1973 when 13.3% of students intended to major in a business-related field.

One of the more important aspects to pay attention to is how the college helps you onto your next steps. So when you research colleges, be sure to check out their career services. You could just google “Career Services”+ college name and read about what they offer. Let’s take two examples:

Elon Career pages include:

  • ELON JOB NETWORK
  • EVENTS
  • STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
  • FIRST DESTINATIONS
  • MEET THE SPDC STAFF
  • STUDENTS – ALUMNI

    CHOOSING A CAREER

    GRADUATE-PROF SCHOOL

    RESUMES-COVER LETTERS

    EJN JOBS-INTERNSHIPS

    INTERVIEWS

    TRANSITION FROM ELON

  • Sections for parents and employers

 

UC San Diego Career pages include: 

  • ·            Upcoming Events
  • o   Job Fairs, Employer events
  • o   Graduate and Professional School Fairs
  • o   Career Development and Job Preparation
  • ·            Career Advising
  • ·            Thinking about Grad School
  • ·            Career Exploration and Preparation
    • o   Explore careers and interest areas
    • o   Prepare for pre-med/health, pre-law, and graduate school
    • o   Prepare for jobs and internships
  • ·            Online Career Development Tools
  • ·            Sections for employers and parents.
  • Basically, both universities, vastly different, cover the information in basically the same way. They even use some of the same career development/job search tools. One area I was excited to see was the UCSD Alumni Destinations page which promised “This interactive graphic demonstrates the connection between areas of study at UC San Diego and the career paths of 73,500 alumni*. The left side of the circle is divided into 15 sections, each representing a major or grouping of majors available at UC San Diego. The right side of the circle is similarly broken into 15 sections, each representing a grouping of careers chosen by our alums.” Only this page no longer exists. It would have appeared very similar to Williams. Oh well. Elon’s page does work, but the information is superficial. One university that does an outstanding job at sharing this data is UC Berkeley. All universities track this data. Ask them for it. This is, in fact, a requirement in the UK and you can compare data by major between different universities at Unistats

    Good career services should be able to tell you:

    • Where their graduates are
    • studying grad school
    • working–both by company, title, industry and salary.
  • who recruits on campus
  • where the student intern
  • Entrepreneurial competitions
  • Career development activities
  • 1:1 advising
  • Princeton Review has provided a ranking of Career services every year, but the list is probably mostly useless. As Poet’s and Quants remarks:

    Of the 42 schools that have been listed in the last six years, only six of them were listed every year, indicating that exemplary career services are rare. However, it does seem like they’re more common at private schools, as only nine public schools were listed at all.

    Here are the schools with the best career services:

    The ‘Best Career Services’ Rankings From 2015 to 2010

     

    2015 Rank & School 2015 Rank 2014 Rank 2013 Rank 2012 Rank 2011 Rank 2010 Rank
     Northeastern University  1  2  1  2  1  4
     Pennsylvania State University – University Park  2  1  2  3  2  6
     Claremont McKenna College  3  4  3  6  7  7
     Bentley University  4  3  16  8  6  12
     Clemson University  5  11  5  9  NR  3
     University of Richmond  6  13  4  10  NR  NR
     Wabash College  7  6  NR  NR  11  NR
     Southwestern University  8  7  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Washington University in St. Louis  9  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     University of Florida  10  5  6  1  4  1
     Kansas State University  11  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Southern Methodist University  12  8  7  19  NR  NR
     Sweet Briar College  13  10  NR  NR  8  8
     Villanova University  14  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Stevens Institute of Technology  15  NR  13  NR  14  NR
     Lafayette College  16  17  8  15  17  NR
     Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering  17  15  NR  20  NR  20
     Barnard College  18  9  11  5  5  2
     Connecticut College  19  NR  NR  NR  NR  11
     Wake Forest University  20  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Webb Institute  NR  12  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Smith College  NR  14  NR  NR  13  13
     Grove City College  NR  16  12  NR  NR  NR
     Scripps College  NR  18  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute  NR  19  9  NR  NR  NR
     University of Pittsburgh – Pittsburgh Campus  NR  20  19  NR  NR  NR
     American University  NR  NR  10  18  15  19
     Tulane University  NR  NR  14  NR  NR  NR
     University of Southern California  NR  NR  15  NR  NR  NR
     Missouri University of Science and Technology  NR  NR  17  11  NR  NR
     Virginia Tech  NR  NR  18  NR  NR  NR
     University of Texas at Austin  NR  NR  20  4  10  5
     Rochester Institute of Technology  NR  NR  NR  7  NR  18
     Spelman College  NR  NR  NR  12  NR  NR
     Yale University  NR  NR  NR  13  3  10
     Cornell University  NR  NR  NR  14  16  15
     University of Missouri – Columbia  NR  NR  NR  16  18  NR
     Worcester Polytechnic Institute  NR  NR  NR  17  20  NR
     Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology  NR  NR  NR  NR  9  9
     Middlebury College  NR  NR  NR  NR  12  14
     Stonehill College  NR  NR  NR  NR  19  17
     University of Notre Dame  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR  16

    Source: The Princeton Review

     

    Princeton Review wrote a book called Colleges that Create Futures focusing on how colleges help students with their future, profiling 50 colleges that are doing a great job. While this rather eclectic list shows breadth, they all share some common features: “hey have excellent career centers. They offer an array of internship opportunities, cooperative education, service learning, and experiential learning programs. They involve undergrads in collaborative research with faculty. They have strong cultures of civic engagement and support student participation in community service and study abroad programs. Their alumni associations are networking empires.

    Some of the schools and examples of their programs are:

    • Arizona State: At its “InnovationSpace” collaborative learning facility, students majoring in engineering, business, design, art, and sustainability work in teams that brainstorm and produce prototypes for real world products that “impact the daily lives of ordinary people.” 
    • Duke University: DukeEngage, a remarkable service-learning program, invites Duke students to identify an opportunity to provide a service anywhere in the world. Duke then helps the student act on that mission, assisting with the student’s travel, lodging, immunizations, and other expenses.  Nearly 3,000 Duke students have participated in this program and served communities in 78 countries.    
    • Northeastern University:  Participation in Northeastern’s cooperative education program –which operates in 114 countries and is one of the largest in the nation – is exemplary on all fronts: 95% of its students spend at least one semester working full time at a company in paid positions. By nine months after graduation, 90% of Northeastern students are employed or in grad school.
    • Washington University in St. Louis has one of the few undergrad entrepreneurship programs that enable students to launch their own on-campus businesses. Approved proposals are facilitated by a campus loan fund, faculty mentorship, access to school mailing lists, and other services. Among the success stories: a student-owned, on-campus bike rental and repair shop.      

     

     

    Other useful tools include:

    Linked in University tool–unfortunately, Linkedin killed this.

     

     

    Starting your College Research: Career development

    As discussed many times in this blog, your major may not matter as much as you think. That said, a growing number of people want a career outcome of going to college. If you look at historical trends as to why a student chooses a particular university you will see that what resonates with the students has grown:

    • This college’s graduates gain admission to top graduate/professional schools in 2005: 27.1% rated this as very important. In 2015: 33.7%
    • This college’s graduates get good jobs in 2005: 47.4% rated it as very important. In 2015: 57.9%

    Contrary to what people think, Business may not be as prevelent as people think:

    Interest in business as a probable field of study peaked in 1987 when more than one-quarter (25.7%) of students intended to major in a business-related field. By 1995, interest in majoring in business had fallen to 15.5% of incoming college students. After a slight recovery in the early years of the 21st century, students’ interest in business as a prob- able field of study fell to 13.5% in 2015, its lowest point since 1973 when 13.3% of students intended to major in a business-related field.

    One of the more important aspects to pay attention to is how the college helps you onto your next steps. So when you research colleges, be sure to check out their career services. You could just google “Career Services”+ college name and read about what they offer. Let’s take two examples:

    Elon Career pages include:

    • ELON JOB NETWORK
    • EVENTS
    • STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
    • FIRST DESTINATIONS
    • MEET THE SPDC STAFF
    • STUDENTS – ALUMNI

      CHOOSING A CAREER

      GRADUATE-PROF SCHOOL

      RESUMES-COVER LETTERS

      EJN JOBS-INTERNSHIPS

      INTERVIEWS

      TRANSITION FROM ELON

    • Sections for parents and employers

     

    UC San Diego Career pages include: 

    • ·            Upcoming Events
    • o   Job Fairs, Employer events
    • o   Graduate and Professional School Fairs
    • o   Career Development and Job Preparation
  • ·            Career Advising
  • ·            Thinking about Grad School
  • ·            Career Exploration and Preparation
    • o   Explore careers and interest areas
    • o   Prepare for pre-med/health, pre-law, and graduate school
    • o   Prepare for jobs and internships
  • ·            Online Career Development Tools
  • ·            Sections for employers and parents.
  • Basically, both universities, vastly different, cover the information in basically the same way. They even use some of the same career development/job search tools. One area I was excited to see was the UCSD Alumni Destinations page which promised “This interactive graphic demonstrates the connection between areas of study at UC San Diego and the career paths of 73,500 alumni*. The left side of the circle is divided into 15 sections, each representing a major or grouping of majors available at UC San Diego. The right side of the circle is similarly broken into 15 sections, each representing a grouping of careers chosen by our alums.” Only this page no longer exists. It would have appeared very similar to Williams. Oh well. Elon’s page does work, but the information is superficial. One university that does an outstanding job at sharing this data is UC Berkeley. All universities track this data. Ask them for it. This is, in fact, a requirement in the UK and you can compare data by major between different universities at Unistats

    Good career services should be able to tell you:

    • Where their graduates are
    • studying grad school
    • working–both by company, title, industry and salary.
  • who recruits on campus
  • where the student intern
  • Entrepreneurial competitions
  • Career development activities
  • 1:1 advising
  • Princeton Review has provided a ranking of Career services every year, but the list is probably mostly useless. As Poet’s and Quants remarks:

    Of the 42 schools that have been listed in the last six years, only six of them were listed every year, indicating that exemplary career services are rare. However, it does seem like they’re more common at private schools, as only nine public schools were listed at all.

    Here are the schools with the best career services:

    The ‘Best Career Services’ Rankings From 2015 to 2010

     

    2015 Rank & School 2015 Rank 2014 Rank 2013 Rank 2012 Rank 2011 Rank 2010 Rank
     Northeastern University  1  2  1  2  1  4
     Pennsylvania State University – University Park  2  1  2  3  2  6
     Claremont McKenna College  3  4  3  6  7  7
     Bentley University  4  3  16  8  6  12
     Clemson University  5  11  5  9  NR  3
     University of Richmond  6  13  4  10  NR  NR
     Wabash College  7  6  NR  NR  11  NR
     Southwestern University  8  7  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Washington University in St. Louis  9  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     University of Florida  10  5  6  1  4  1
     Kansas State University  11  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Southern Methodist University  12  8  7  19  NR  NR
     Sweet Briar College  13  10  NR  NR  8  8
     Villanova University  14  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Stevens Institute of Technology  15  NR  13  NR  14  NR
     Lafayette College  16  17  8  15  17  NR
     Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering  17  15  NR  20  NR  20
     Barnard College  18  9  11  5  5  2
     Connecticut College  19  NR  NR  NR  NR  11
     Wake Forest University  20  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Webb Institute  NR  12  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Smith College  NR  14  NR  NR  13  13
     Grove City College  NR  16  12  NR  NR  NR
     Scripps College  NR  18  NR  NR  NR  NR
     Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute  NR  19  9  NR  NR  NR
     University of Pittsburgh – Pittsburgh Campus  NR  20  19  NR  NR  NR
     American University  NR  NR  10  18  15  19
     Tulane University  NR  NR  14  NR  NR  NR
     University of Southern California  NR  NR  15  NR  NR  NR
     Missouri University of Science and Technology  NR  NR  17  11  NR  NR
     Virginia Tech  NR  NR  18  NR  NR  NR
     University of Texas at Austin  NR  NR  20  4  10  5
     Rochester Institute of Technology  NR  NR  NR  7  NR  18
     Spelman College  NR  NR  NR  12  NR  NR
     Yale University  NR  NR  NR  13  3  10
     Cornell University  NR  NR  NR  14  16  15
     University of Missouri – Columbia  NR  NR  NR  16  18  NR
     Worcester Polytechnic Institute  NR  NR  NR  17  20  NR
     Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology  NR  NR  NR  NR  9  9
     Middlebury College  NR  NR  NR  NR  12  14
     Stonehill College  NR  NR  NR  NR  19  17
     University of Notre Dame  NR  NR  NR  NR  NR  16

    Source: The Princeton Review

     

    Princeton Review wrote a book called Colleges that Create Futures focusing on how colleges help students with their future, profiling 50 colleges that are doing a great job. While this rather eclectic list shows breadth, they all share some common features: “hey have excellent career centers. They offer an array of internship opportunities, cooperative education, service learning, and experiential learning programs. They involve undergrads in collaborative research with faculty. They have strong cultures of civic engagement and support student participation in community service and study abroad programs. Their alumni associations are networking empires.

    Some of the schools and examples of their programs are:

    • Arizona State: At its “InnovationSpace” collaborative learning facility, students majoring in engineering, business, design, art, and sustainability work in teams that brainstorm and produce prototypes for real world products that “impact the daily lives of ordinary people.” 
    • Duke University: DukeEngage, a remarkable service-learning program, invites Duke students to identify an opportunity to provide a service anywhere in the world. Duke then helps the student act on that mission, assisting with the student’s travel, lodging, immunizations, and other expenses.  Nearly 3,000 Duke students have participated in this program and served communities in 78 countries.    
    • Northeastern University:  Participation in Northeastern’s cooperative education program –which operates in 114 countries and is one of the largest in the nation – is exemplary on all fronts: 95% of its students spend at least one semester working full time at a company in paid positions. By nine months after graduation, 90% of Northeastern students are employed or in grad school.
    • Washington University in St. Louis has one of the few undergrad entrepreneurship programs that enable students to launch their own on-campus businesses. Approved proposals are facilitated by a campus loan fund, faculty mentorship, access to school mailing lists, and other services. Among the success stories: a student-owned, on-campus bike rental and repair shop.      

     

     

     

     

    Stats, lies and distortions

    Inc. in declared: “LinkedIn Reveals the Schools Desired by Top Companies” which led me to the original study by Withmydegree who stated they “Using LinkedIn, we took a look at the hiring trends for alumni from top colleges to learn more. ” Only their results reveal something entirely else. Yes many significant companies hire from top schools. In this graphic, the vast majority companies hire more than 50% of their workforce from not the top 100:

    Facebook is an exception, hiring 50% from the top 10 colleges. Facebook has 13,598 employees as of March 31, 2016. USing linked in myself I determined that 1300 current employees came from the US News top 10. This works bout to about 10%. Hardly the 55% the chart shows. In fairness, the article does state new grads. My basic linked in account does not allow for that differentiation. Facebook had almost 12,000 employees as of 9/15/15. This suggest they hired about 1600 people this past year. The chart suggests 900 came from the top 11 schools (we have a tie in number 10). Zuck’s own “strategy” on hiring gives little insight: “So the Facebook CEO said that his team looks for people whose values align with the company’s. ”Facebook is not a company for everyone in the world,” he said.” Director of Product Design, Julia Zhou says:

    Sometimes, designers without traditional training possess an ingenuity that you don’t usually see. We’re really just looking for people who have that element of extreme pro-activity. Even if they did go to a great school, they should have experience stretching themselves on projects both inside and outside of the classroom. Great candidates take the initiative to experiment, design and build on their own.

     

    How much is your major worth?

    Sadly this question always is answered in terms of money, not value, as in human value. Has your college degree made you a better person? Does your degree enable you contribute meaningfully to society? Do you live a lifestyle consistent with your values? If none of those are important to you, than this graph is for you:

     

     

    This according to pay scale.

    Career spotlight

    The internet has transformed career exploration. With lots of great assessments, job search sites and career profiles, it is easy to find information, but really too easy. One of my emerging favorites is the Career Spotlight section of LifeHacker. “Career Spotlight is an interview series on Lifehacker that focuses on regular people and the jobs you might not hear much about—from doctors to plumbers to aerospace engineers and everything in between. ” The profiles focus on a wide array of jobs from every day jobs to super specialist. 

    Careers profiled so far:

    • Manufacturing Engineer
    • Personal Trainer
    • Product Designer
    • Court Reporter
    • Bar Owner
    • Botanist
    • Dog Sitter and Trainer
    • NASA Engineer
    • Social Worker
    • Food Scientist
    • Anesthesiologist
    • Diplomat
    • Airport Operations
    • Genealogist
    • Aerial Photographer
    • Fraud Analyst
    • an “Ethical Hacker”
    • a Physician Assistant
    • Online Accountant
    • Game Designer
    • Pathology Lab Technician
    • Software Architect
    • Microwave Engineer
    • Officer in the U.S. Army
    • TV News Assignment Editor
    • Archaeologist
    • Front-End Web Developer
    • Research Geologist
    • Cloud Developer
    • Landscape Architect
    • LEGO Model Designer
    • Data Scientist
    • Train Engineer
    • Comic Book Artist
    • Hotel Manager
    • Airline Pilot
    • Restaurant Manager
    • Librarian
    • Car Salesman
    • Digital Product Designer
    • ER Doctor
    • Aerospace Engineer

    The growing cluelessness of of business insider rankings

    WIth ranking seasons well underway, Business Insider is carrying a series of “best colleges for…”. I read with both interest and trepidation. Take the latest article, best colleges for working in finance, which distills the colective wisdom from 1000 business insider readers. They come up with this obvious piece of advice: 54% say study busines sif you want a succcesful career in finance. Except they contradict themselves by creating a list of colleges that really do not have much focus on business. In fact, of the top 10 colleges on their list, only one, Upenn, offers a degree in business. Cornell offers Hospitality Management and Applied Economics Management, which I guess you could argue is basically the same thing. Of the second ten, 6 offer business, and one has a certificate of business. 

    Still it does make you wonder. Even more so when you compare with Linked In which actually analyzes peoples job titles in their profiles to determined the colleges that produce financers. 

     

    University

    Linked in Ranking

    Business Insider ranking

    University of Pennsylvania

    1

    9

    Yale University

    2

    2

    Georgetown University

    3

    11

    Princeton University

    4

    6

    Columbia University

    5

    7

    New York University

    6

    15

    Duke University

    7

    4

    Harvard University

    8

    1

    Cornell University

    9

    10

    Dartmouth College

    10

    8

    University of Notre Dame

    11

    21

    Wake Forest University

    12

    NR

    Villanova University

    13

    NR

    Boston College

    14

    19

    Wellesley College

    15

    NR

    Amherst College

    16

    23

    Brown University

    17

    23

    Lehigh University

    18

    NR

    Rice University

    19

    NR

    Carnegie Mellon University

    20

    NR

     

    Free Resources for Career exploration and planning

    List of Higher Education Commisions by state

    Some high profile state planning sites. Some require registrations. 

    Colorado

    I previously blogged about Free interest, strengths and personality assessments. 

    Entrepreneurship Redux

    Today, well over 400,000 students a year take courses in the subject, and almost 9,000 faculty members teach it.

    Source: Kaufman Institute

    The mind boggles. All these young people pursuing Higher ed taking Entrepreneurship classes. The Kaufman report provides a rare insight that moves beyond just a simple ranking.  

     

    Entrepreneur Magazine

    College

    US NEWS

    Business week

    Linked in

    1

    Babson College

    1

    2

    12

    2

    University of Houston

     

     

     

    3

    University of Southern California

    2

    7

     

    4

    Syracuse University

    8

    5

     

    5

    Baylor University

     

    3

     

    6

    The University of Oklahoma

     

     

     

    7

    Stanford University

     

     

    1

    8

    Washington University in St. Louis

     

    9

     

    9

    Brigham Young University

     

     

     

    10

    Northeastern University

     

     

     

     

    MIT

    3

     

    2

     

    Bloomington

    4

     

     

     

    UPENN

    5

     

    6

    17

    U Arizona

    6

    10

     

    16

    UNC

    7

     

     

     

    UC Berkeley

    8

     

    5

     

    U Texas

    10

     

     

     

    WPI

     

    1

     

     

    Cornell

     

    4

     

    22

    TCU

     

    6

     

     

    Case Western

     

    8

     

     

    Harvard

     

     

    3

     

    Cal Tech

     

     

    4

     

    Dartmouth

     

     

    7

     

    UCLA

     

     

    8

     

    Princeton

     

     

    9

     

    Harverdord

     

     

    10

     

    Yale

     

     

    11

     

    Borwn

     

     

    13

     

    Northwestern

     

     

    14

     

    Harvey Mudd

     

     

    15

     

    Swarthmore

     

     

    16

     

    Claremont

     

     

    17

     

    Amherst

     

     

    18

     

    Williams

     

     

    19

     

    Swarthmore

     

     

    20

     

    Ironically, the university credited with offering the first course in Entrepreneurship, Harvard, just prevented two of their students taking their start up any further according to Bloomberg

    What is the aspiring entrepreneur to do? Here is a couple of worthwhile endevors:

     

     

     

    Data mining College career reports

    Most colleges have very active career centers. Most career centers track their students outcomes after graduation. Simply google “career Services” + “college name” and you should be able to find the center, then look for the report. There is no standarization of the information. But still it can be helpful. Below is a list put toghter by the folks at  College Confidential
    CWRU http://students.case.edu/careers/students/explore/survey/doc/fds2011.pdf
    Colorado School of Mines: Salary Survey and Annual Report
    Colorado State: The Colorado State University Career Center | Students | Major and Career Exploration
    Cornell: Postgraduate Report and Survey | College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences), Cornell Engineering: Post Graduate Reports (College of Engineering)
    Dayton: Career Services : University of Dayton, Ohio
    Delaware: Career Plans
    Florida State: Statisctics on FSU Students and Communication – Matching Majors to Occupations – The Career Center – Linking Futures
    Georgia Tech: http://www.adors.gatech.edu/assessment/adors/commencement/salary_report.cfm
    James Madison: JMU – Survey Data and Career and Academic Planning – James Madison University
    Kansas State: Salary and Occupational Information | Students | CES | Kansas State University
    Lehigh:http://careerservices.sites.lehigh.edu/docs/Undergraduate%20Placement%20Report%202011.pdf
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Survey Data | MIT Global Education & Career Development
    Michigan: Employment Data – Stephen M. Ross School of Business (business), Salary data for liberal arts majors | Career Center (liberal arts), http://career.engin.umich.edu/employers/oncampus/guide-for-recruiters.pdf (engineering)
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute:http://rpi.edu/dept/cdc/students/jobsearch/offers/Copy%20of%202012_Average_Salaries_FINAL.pdf(2012), http://rpi.edu/dept/cdc/CCPD_Annual_Report_2011%20(2).pdf (2011),http://rpi.edu/dept/cdc/students/jobsearch/offers/consumerinfo.html and Publication Name: (2010)
    Rochester Institute of Technology: Students – Salary Data | Office of Co-op and Career Services
    Rose Hulman: Recruitment & Employment Statistics – Career Services – Offices & Services | Rose-Hulman
    San Jose State: Career Center | Employment/Salary Data | San Jose State University
    Stanford: Stanford Salary Statistics | Student Affairs
    Stevens Institute of Technology:https://www.stevens.edu/sit/sites/default/files/Class_of_2012_Outcomes_Report_Final.pdf
    Syracuse: http://careerservices.syr.edu/pdf/2011/2011-placement-report.pdf

    What sort of decision maker are you?

    Kent State Universit Career Services offers a free set of tools, one of which is kind of intriguing: What sort of Decision maker are you? My results call me a spontaneous decision maker. 

    Spontaneous Decision Makers:

    • make decisions based on what feels right
    • make decisions quickly
    • see new possibilities and change goals easily
    • rarely establish specific plans
    • get bored easily
    • will take risks

    External Decision Makers:

    • think about decisions out loud
    • can argue all sides of an issue
    • need to talk to others before making a decision
    • talk and then think

    If you are curious about the other styles of decision making, view information on the Spontaneous/External Style, the Spontaneous/Internal Style, the Systematic/External Style, and the Systematic/Internal Style.

    Curious what yours might be? Try it now. It takes just a few minutes.