Category Archives: Careers

Stats, lies and distortions

Inc. in declared: “LinkedIn Reveals the Schools Desired by Top Companies” which led me to the original study by Withmydegree who stated they “Using LinkedIn, we took a look at the hiring trends for alumni from top colleges to learn more. ” Only their results reveal something entirely else. Yes many significant companies hire from top schools. In this graphic, the vast majority companies hire more than 50% of their workforce from not the top 100:

Facebook is an exception, hiring 50% from the top 10 colleges. Facebook has 13,598 employees as of March 31, 2016. USing linked in myself I determined that 1300 current employees came from the US News top 10. This works bout to about 10%. Hardly the 55% the chart shows. In fairness, the article does state new grads. My basic linked in account does not allow for that differentiation. Facebook had almost 12,000 employees as of 9/15/15. This suggest they hired about 1600 people this past year. The chart suggests 900 came from the top 11 schools (we have a tie in number 10). Zuck’s own “strategy” on hiring gives little insight: “So the Facebook CEO said that his team looks for people whose values align with the company’s. ”Facebook is not a company for everyone in the world,” he said.” Director of Product Design, Julia Zhou says:

Sometimes, designers without traditional training possess an ingenuity that you don’t usually see. We’re really just looking for people who have that element of extreme pro-activity. Even if they did go to a great school, they should have experience stretching themselves on projects both inside and outside of the classroom. Great candidates take the initiative to experiment, design and build on their own.

 

How much is your major worth?

Sadly this question always is answered in terms of money, not value, as in human value. Has your college degree made you a better person? Does your degree enable you contribute meaningfully to society? Do you live a lifestyle consistent with your values? If none of those are important to you, than this graph is for you:

 

 

This according to pay scale.

Career spotlight

The internet has transformed career exploration. With lots of great assessments, job search sites and career profiles, it is easy to find information, but really too easy. One of my emerging favorites is the Career Spotlight section of LifeHacker. “Career Spotlight is an interview series on Lifehacker that focuses on regular people and the jobs you might not hear much about—from doctors to plumbers to aerospace engineers and everything in between. ” The profiles focus on a wide array of jobs from every day jobs to super specialist. 

Careers profiled so far:

  • Manufacturing Engineer
  • Personal Trainer
  • Product Designer
  • Court Reporter
  • Bar Owner
  • Botanist
  • Dog Sitter and Trainer
  • NASA Engineer
  • Social Worker
  • Food Scientist
  • Anesthesiologist
  • Diplomat
  • Airport Operations
  • Genealogist
  • Aerial Photographer
  • Fraud Analyst
  • an “Ethical Hacker”
  • a Physician Assistant
  • Online Accountant
  • Game Designer
  • Pathology Lab Technician
  • Software Architect
  • Microwave Engineer
  • Officer in the U.S. Army
  • TV News Assignment Editor
  • Archaeologist
  • Front-End Web Developer
  • Research Geologist
  • Cloud Developer
  • Landscape Architect
  • LEGO Model Designer
  • Data Scientist
  • Train Engineer
  • Comic Book Artist
  • Hotel Manager
  • Airline Pilot
  • Restaurant Manager
  • Librarian
  • Car Salesman
  • Digital Product Designer
  • ER Doctor
  • Aerospace Engineer

The growing cluelessness of of business insider rankings

WIth ranking seasons well underway, Business Insider is carrying a series of “best colleges for…”. I read with both interest and trepidation. Take the latest article, best colleges for working in finance, which distills the colective wisdom from 1000 business insider readers. They come up with this obvious piece of advice: 54% say study busines sif you want a succcesful career in finance. Except they contradict themselves by creating a list of colleges that really do not have much focus on business. In fact, of the top 10 colleges on their list, only one, Upenn, offers a degree in business. Cornell offers Hospitality Management and Applied Economics Management, which I guess you could argue is basically the same thing. Of the second ten, 6 offer business, and one has a certificate of business. 

Still it does make you wonder. Even more so when you compare with Linked In which actually analyzes peoples job titles in their profiles to determined the colleges that produce financers. 

 

University

Linked in Ranking

Business Insider ranking

University of Pennsylvania

1

9

Yale University

2

2

Georgetown University

3

11

Princeton University

4

6

Columbia University

5

7

New York University

6

15

Duke University

7

4

Harvard University

8

1

Cornell University

9

10

Dartmouth College

10

8

University of Notre Dame

11

21

Wake Forest University

12

NR

Villanova University

13

NR

Boston College

14

19

Wellesley College

15

NR

Amherst College

16

23

Brown University

17

23

Lehigh University

18

NR

Rice University

19

NR

Carnegie Mellon University

20

NR

 

Free Resources for Career exploration and planning

List of Higher Education Commisions by state

Some high profile state planning sites. Some require registrations. 

Colorado

I previously blogged about Free interest, strengths and personality assessments. 

Entrepreneurship Redux

Today, well over 400,000 students a year take courses in the subject, and almost 9,000 faculty members teach it.

Source: Kaufman Institute

The mind boggles. All these young people pursuing Higher ed taking Entrepreneurship classes. The Kaufman report provides a rare insight that moves beyond just a simple ranking.  

 

Entrepreneur Magazine

College

US NEWS

Business week

Linked in

1

Babson College

1

2

12

2

University of Houston

 

 

 

3

University of Southern California

2

7

 

4

Syracuse University

8

5

 

5

Baylor University

 

3

 

6

The University of Oklahoma

 

 

 

7

Stanford University

 

 

1

8

Washington University in St. Louis

 

9

 

9

Brigham Young University

 

 

 

10

Northeastern University

 

 

 

 

MIT

3

 

2

 

Bloomington

4

 

 

 

UPENN

5

 

6

17

U Arizona

6

10

 

16

UNC

7

 

 

 

UC Berkeley

8

 

5

 

U Texas

10

 

 

 

WPI

 

1

 

 

Cornell

 

4

 

22

TCU

 

6

 

 

Case Western

 

8

 

 

Harvard

 

 

3

 

Cal Tech

 

 

4

 

Dartmouth

 

 

7

 

UCLA

 

 

8

 

Princeton

 

 

9

 

Harverdord

 

 

10

 

Yale

 

 

11

 

Borwn

 

 

13

 

Northwestern

 

 

14

 

Harvey Mudd

 

 

15

 

Swarthmore

 

 

16

 

Claremont

 

 

17

 

Amherst

 

 

18

 

Williams

 

 

19

 

Swarthmore

 

 

20

 

Ironically, the university credited with offering the first course in Entrepreneurship, Harvard, just prevented two of their students taking their start up any further according to Bloomberg

What is the aspiring entrepreneur to do? Here is a couple of worthwhile endevors:

 

 

 

Data mining College career reports

Most colleges have very active career centers. Most career centers track their students outcomes after graduation. Simply google “career Services” + “college name” and you should be able to find the center, then look for the report. There is no standarization of the information. But still it can be helpful. Below is a list put toghter by the folks at  College Confidential
CWRU http://students.case.edu/careers/students/explore/survey/doc/fds2011.pdf
Colorado School of Mines: Salary Survey and Annual Report
Colorado State: The Colorado State University Career Center | Students | Major and Career Exploration
Cornell: Postgraduate Report and Survey | College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (College of Agriculture and Life Sciences), Cornell Engineering: Post Graduate Reports (College of Engineering)
Dayton: Career Services : University of Dayton, Ohio
Delaware: Career Plans
Florida State: Statisctics on FSU Students and Communication – Matching Majors to Occupations – The Career Center – Linking Futures
Georgia Tech: http://www.adors.gatech.edu/assessment/adors/commencement/salary_report.cfm
James Madison: JMU – Survey Data and Career and Academic Planning – James Madison University
Kansas State: Salary and Occupational Information | Students | CES | Kansas State University
Lehigh:http://careerservices.sites.lehigh.edu/docs/Undergraduate%20Placement%20Report%202011.pdf
Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Survey Data | MIT Global Education & Career Development
Michigan: Employment Data – Stephen M. Ross School of Business (business), Salary data for liberal arts majors | Career Center (liberal arts), http://career.engin.umich.edu/employers/oncampus/guide-for-recruiters.pdf (engineering)
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute:http://rpi.edu/dept/cdc/students/jobsearch/offers/Copy%20of%202012_Average_Salaries_FINAL.pdf(2012), http://rpi.edu/dept/cdc/CCPD_Annual_Report_2011%20(2).pdf (2011),http://rpi.edu/dept/cdc/students/jobsearch/offers/consumerinfo.html and Publication Name: (2010)
Rochester Institute of Technology: Students – Salary Data | Office of Co-op and Career Services
Rose Hulman: Recruitment & Employment Statistics – Career Services – Offices & Services | Rose-Hulman
San Jose State: Career Center | Employment/Salary Data | San Jose State University
Stanford: Stanford Salary Statistics | Student Affairs
Stevens Institute of Technology:https://www.stevens.edu/sit/sites/default/files/Class_of_2012_Outcomes_Report_Final.pdf
Syracuse: http://careerservices.syr.edu/pdf/2011/2011-placement-report.pdf

What sort of decision maker are you?

Kent State Universit Career Services offers a free set of tools, one of which is kind of intriguing: What sort of Decision maker are you? My results call me a spontaneous decision maker. 

Spontaneous Decision Makers:

  • make decisions based on what feels right
  • make decisions quickly
  • see new possibilities and change goals easily
  • rarely establish specific plans
  • get bored easily
  • will take risks

External Decision Makers:

  • think about decisions out loud
  • can argue all sides of an issue
  • need to talk to others before making a decision
  • talk and then think

If you are curious about the other styles of decision making, view information on the Spontaneous/External Style, the Spontaneous/Internal Style, the Systematic/External Style, and the Systematic/Internal Style.

Curious what yours might be? Try it now. It takes just a few minutes. 

UCLA Film program now accepting Freshmen

For years, UCLA had what is widely regarded as one of the very best film programs. Obviously it was incredibly competitive. What surprised most people is that you actually could not appy to it until your second year as the major is a two year program. Well, UCLA quietly made a chaneg this summer and annoucned that Freshman applicants can apply directly to the film school. 

In the first two years of the B.A. program, students primarily focus on completing general education and University required course work. In the third year, students are introduced to all major aspects of film, television, and digital media study. In the fourth year, each student completes a senior concentration chosen from film production, television production (narrative or documentary), screenwriting, animation, digital media or cinema & media studies. Students must also complete at least one professional internship during the senior year.

To be honest, not much has really changed; You really do not get into the film courses until junior year. 

 Freshman & Sophmore Year

General Education Requirements
School of Theater, Film, and Television Requirements

Preparation for the Major (21 units)

  • 106A History of the American Motion Picture
  • 110A American Television History

Theater course (history, literature, or production)

One course selected from:

  • 106B History of the European Motion Picture
  • 106C History of African, Asian, and Latin American Film

Major Requirements (66 units)

Junior Year

 

  • 100 Undergraduate Symposium (Fall)
  • 115 Stylistic Studies for the Moving Image (Fall)
  • 134 Intermediate Screenwriting Workshop (formerly 130C)
  • 150 Cinematography
  • 154 Film Editing
  • 155 Digital Media and Tools
  • 163 Directing the Camera
  • 185 Television & Video Production (Fall)

Choose one:

 

  • C132 Screenwriting Fundamentals (formerly 130A)
  • 133 An In Depth Introduction to the Fundamentals of Screenwriting (formerly 130B)

One Cinema & Media Studies elective (not previously taken) from:

 

  • 106B History of the European Motion Picture
  • 106C History of African, Asian, and Latin American Film
  • 107 Experimental Film
  • 108 History of Documentary Film
  • 112 Film and Social Change
  • 113 Film Authors
  • 114 Film Genres
  • 116 Film Criticism
  • M117 Chicanos in Film/Video

Students must select a Senior Concentration in Spring quarter of the junior year.

Senior Year

Senior Concentration

 

  • Narrative Film Production
  • Documentary
  • Screenwriting
  • Animation
  • Digital Media
  • Cinema & Media Studies

The Senior Concentration consists of a minimum of 20 units of course work taken in the senior year and completion of a senior project.

Junior or Senior Year

 

  • 183A, B, or C
  • 195 Internship

Meanwhile, USC has gone the otherway, making their BA program Transfer only. They have their BFA program starting in freshman year. Check out the sample 4 year plan here. Meanwhile Chapman continues to offer their 4 year bachelor’s in film studies as well as a BFA. Compare that with NYU’s program and you have four outstanding options. 

 

Pursuing Industrial design.

What is industrial design?
“Industrial design is the study of human nature.”
~ Tom Matano

Why is it important?

There is a great Youtube Chanel with lots of videos like this one.

And which colleges offer great Industrial design programs?

Core 77 offers up great advice from Choosing a design school and making your portfolio.

Bloomberg (2007) catalogues the best in theworld. Here is the most recent version. 

 

According to Design Intelligence magazine, they hold the following as offering the best undergraduate programs in the US

Industrial Design, Undergraduate

  • 1. Art Center College of Design
  • 1. University of Cincinnati
  • 3. Pratt Institute
  • 3. Rhode Island School of Design
  • 3. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • 6. Auburn University
  • 6. College for Creative Studies
  • 6. Savannah College of Art and Design
  • 9. Carnegie Mellon
  • 9. Syracuse University