Category Archives: Australia

What it costs to study where…

According to an infographic created by Forbes based on student fess (this excludes tuition)

The information is culled from a report by the bank HSBC. I cannot find anything more recent than September, 2014. The more interesting document I found has to do with parent ambitions, which was just released froma survey of over 5000 parents in 16 countries. Some key insights:

Structures that promote caring, Part II: The Residential College

Residential Colleges

Since the earliest days of Universities, students have lived in a system that has become known as the Residential College. Starting in Cambridge and Oxford, many other universities adopted the Residential Colleges as they sprung up. In modern times, the residential college has become synonamous with places like YaleRice, and University of California at Santa Cruz.  Collegiate way lists another 28 colleges in the USA that offer students the opportunity to live and learn in a residential college. Some Universities, like Duke and Vanderbilt offer a freshman residential experience that would be on par.

The Residential College is not just a dormitory, but something much more important and integral to the learning experience:

In its most generic sense, the term may be used to refer to an institution that houses most of its students on-campus as opposed to an institution with a large commuter or off-campus population. Many small, independent, liberal arts colleges conform to this definition of residential college. In a more restricted sense, the term residential college may be used interchangeably with terms such as living-learning center, theme house, and residential learning community. This usage, however, may obscure important differences between the classical model of residential college, conventional residence halls, and other types of contemporary residence education programs.

And more:

A 1998 meta-analysis by Gregory Blimling of studies published from 1966 through June 1997 shows, however, that residential colleges, as compared to conventional halls, increase students’ academic performance and retention and enhance the social climate of the living unit. Blimling’s study does not distinguish clearly between classic residential colleges and living-learning centers.

According to studies conducted in 1991 by George D. Kuh and associates and in 1993 by Jerry A. Stark, faculty participating in residential colleges or living/learning centers report improvement in their teaching skills and enhanced relationships with faculty from other disciplines. Frances Arndt reported in 1993 that faculty also held positive attitudes about opportunities offered by residential colleges for teaching a variety of special and experimental courses.

Also well worth the reading an artcile for StateUniversity.Com And this: 

Previous literature has consistently demonstrated a positive influence of residential living on the success of a student’s university experience (Stevens, 1996; LaNasa, Olson & Alleman, 2007). The impact of residential living on the university experience is believed to be multidimensional (Zhao & Kuh, 2004), it may also depend on how satisfied the student is with their arrangement. The most successful residential colleges are those living-learning colleges prominent in USA (LaNasa et. al, 2007). These colleges facilitate not only heightened living conditions but the environment assists to recruit and support student success and learning. Therefore such findings emphasise the need for residential communities to not only be a place to live, but to also foster academics and student success. There has been shown that on-campus living has a positive, often indirect effect on student growth and social development, this is associated with the on-campus environment increasing student involvement through maximised opportunities for social, cultural and extracurricular involvement (LaNasa et al, 2007).

Other research shows that

Students in residential learning communities had significantly higher levels of involvement, interaction, integration, and gains in learning and intellectual development than did students in traditional residence halls. 

The Collegiate Way, a web sit dedicated to Residential College, provides four questions that you should ask when exploring how a college’s living situation works:

o   “How many faculty live on campus?” The number of faculty living on campus is a good sign of an institution’s commitment to creating a comprehensive educational environment. And the question is not how many staff members or “student life professionals” live on campus, but how many faculty: professors, lecturers, deans, and so on, who not only participate in residential life but who also teach biology, or philosophy, or mathematics, or art, or some other academic discipline. Are there faculty offices in the dormitories? If so, that is also a good sign.

o   “Does the university have ‘theme halls’?” Theme halls are dormitories or dormitory corridors that group together students who have a common interest or background. Although at first glance this might seem like a good idea, theme halls are really not in students’ best educational interest. If all the art students live together, or all the science students, or all the athletes, how will any of them be able to learn and grow intellectually from exposure to the full range of talents and interests that other students have? If the university you are visiting has theme halls you might ask instead, “Why does the university segregate students in this way instead of integrating them so they can benefit from living in a diverse environment?”

o   “How many juniors and seniors live on campus?” How many graduate students? Are they segregated from the other students, or is everyone mixed together? If the campus dormitories are populated almost entirely by freshmen and sophomores, that is a bad sign. It means either that the conditions are so poor that older students don’t want to stay, or that the university is only concerned with rental occupancy and is not trying to create a rich and diverse educational environment.

o   “Do faculty eat in the campus dining halls?” If you visit a dining hall, look around and see if there are university faculty and staff eating there as well as students. Is the dining hall a noisy student ghetto with a widescreen television blaring away, or is it a relaxing, home-like place where people can talk and get to know each other?

o   “How are the dormitories used during the summer?” Many universities rent their dormitory space during the summer to make money, and in itself this is not objectionable. But who are the tenants? If the space is rented to academic societies, professional organizations, local charities, and the like, that is a good sign. If it is rented to summer sports camps, that may be a bad sign. Years of personal observation have taught me that summer sports camps are often badly supervised and commit extensive vandalism. Their presence may mean that campus buildings are so poorly maintained that more responsible groups don’t want to stay in them. Do you want your son or daughter’s campus home to be routinely vandalized over the summer?

Looking at the CollegiateWay’s listings, you can see that he makes a distinction between the Residential Colleges of Universities and the small liberal arts and science colleges that offer a very similar experience, albeit on a more intimate experience.

Each of these institutions—along with many others around the world—has established, is planning, or is expanding an internal system of residential colleges: permanent, cross-sectional, faculty-led societies that provide the advantages of a small college in the environment of a large university.

For what may be the most comprehensive listing of Residential Colleges in the world, visit Collegiate Way:

 

 

Most expensive countries for international students

The following is what HSBC concluded international students will pay to attend university in various countries.

Country Annual fees (USD) Annual cost of living (USD) Annual total (USD)
Australia 25,375 13,140 38,516
United States 25,226 10,479 35,705
United Kingdom 19,291 11,034 30,325
United Arab Emirates 21,371 6,004 27,375
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Singapore 14,885 9,363 24,248
Hong Kong 13,182 9,261 22,443
Japan 6,522 12,642 19,164
Russia 3,131 6,310 9,441
China 3,983 4,783 8,766
Taiwan 3,270 4,987 8,257
Spain 1,002 6,004 7,006
Germany 635 5,650 6,285

 

Australia, surpsingly comes in at the highest, which is incredibly deceptive. Firstly, an Australian (and UK) degree, will typically take you three years while Canadian and US degress take four years. Secondly, HSBC uses tuition soures based on what Forbes list, but it is unclear if they are using the “ten largest” or the Ivy League or what? Since the ten largest US institutions are not considered the elite of the US. Furthermore, many students receive discounts in the form of financial aid at the top US colleges, but those are tied to a family’s ability to pay.  Since the typical ivy league education (Princeton) is $56,750, this puts a US education well ahead of Australia. Moreover, if we extraoplate over 4 years, this hits a whopping $227,000 whereas Australia comes in 115,548, or almost half. UK comes in at about 91K. Canada rounds out just over $104 K. 

Why Canada get’s two entries just adds to the sloppy presentation. 

And why would they leave out some stellar international destinations like the Netherlands, Switzerland or New Zealand?

Most expensive countries to study in for international students?

The following is what HSBC concluded international students will pay to attend university in various countries.

Country Annual fees (USD) Annual cost of living (USD) Annual total (USD)
Australia 25,375 13,140 38,516
United States 25,226 10,479 35,705
United Kingdom 19,291 11,034 30,325
United Arab Emirates 21,371 6,004 27,375
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Singapore 14,885 9,363 24,248
Hong Kong 13,182 9,261 22,443
Japan 6,522 12,642 19,164
Russia 3,131 6,310 9,441
China 3,983 4,783 8,766
Taiwan 3,270 4,987 8,257
Spain 1,002 6,004 7,006
Germany 635 5,650 6,285

 

Australia, surpsingly comes in at the highest, which is incredibly deceptive. Firstly, an Australian (and UK) degree, will typically take you three years while Canadian and US degress take four years. Secondly, HSBC uses tuition soures based on what Forbes list, but it is unclear if they are using the “ten largest” or the Ivy League or what? Since the ten largest US institutions are not considered the elite of the US. Furthermore, many students receive discounts in the form of financial aid at the top US colleges, but those are tied to a family’s ability to pay.  Since the typical ivy league education (Princeton) is $56,750, this puts a US education well ahead of Australia. Moreover, if we extraoplate over 4 years, this hits a whopping $227,000 whereas Australia comes in 115,548, or almost half. UK comes in at about 91K. Canada rounds out just over $104 K. 

Why Canada get’s two entries just adds to the sloppy presentation. 

And why would they leave out some stellar international destinations like the Netherlands, Switzerland or New Zealand?

Australia the most expensive country?

The following is what HSBC concluded international students will pay to attend university in various countries.

Country Annual fees (USD) Annual cost of living (USD) Annual total (USD)
Australia 25,375 13,140 38,516
United States 25,226 10,479 35,705
United Kingdom 19,291 11,034 30,325
United Arab Emirates 21,371 6,004 27,375
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Canada 18,474 7,537 26,011
Singapore 14,885 9,363 24,248
Hong Kong 13,182 9,261 22,443
Japan 6,522 12,642 19,164
Russia 3,131 6,310 9,441
China 3,983 4,783 8,766
Taiwan 3,270 4,987 8,257
Spain 1,002 6,004 7,006
Germany 635 5,650 6,285

 

Australia, surpsingly comes in at the highest, which is incredibly deceptive. Firstly, an Australian (and UK) degree, will typically take you three years while Canadian and US degress take four years. Secondly, HSBC uses tuition soures based on what Forbes list, but it is unclear if they are using the “ten largest” or the Ivy League or what? Since the ten largest US institutions are not considered the elite of the US. Furthermore, many students receive discounts in the form of financial aid at the top US colleges, but those are tied to a family’s ability to pay.  Since the typical ivy league education (Princeton) is $56,750, this puts a US education well ahead of Australia. Moreover, if we extraoplate over 4 years, this hits a whopping $227,000 whereas Australia comes in 115,548, or almost half. UK comes in at about 91K. Canada rounds out just over $104 K. 

Why Canada get’s two entries just adds to the sloppy presentation. 

And why would they leave out some stellar international destinations like the Netherlands, Switzerland or New Zealand?

SO where should the future wealth seekers go if the US is not their destination? Wealth-X figured it out for you. 

PHOTO: The Chapel, Keble College, Oxford University, Oxford.
Getty Images
1.
University of Oxford

United Kingdom

372 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: Aerial View of the Rajabai Clock Tower, Bombay Stock Exchange Building, Mumbai University and Mumbai City in Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
Shriya Patil/The India Today Group/Getty Images
2.
University of Mumbai

India

361 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: University of Cambridge, King's College, view from Great St. Mary's Church.
Getty Images
3.
University of Cambridge

United Kingdom

273 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The main entrance to the London School of Economics.
Umezo Kamata/Wikipedia
4.
London School of Economics and Political Science

United Kingdom

247 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The Great Hall of the University of Sydney.
Toby Hudson/Wikipedia
5.
University of Sydney

Australia

229 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The University of Dehli main building.
seek1/Wikipedia
6.
University of Delhi

India

211 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The Asia campus of Insead stands in Singapore, Dec. 6, 2010.
Munshi Ahmed/Bloomberg via Getty Images
7.
Insead

France

176 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The Australian School of Business building at the University of New South Wales.
unsw.flickr/flickr
8.
University of New South Wales

Australia

163 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: Engineering building at the National University of Singapore.
Wikipedia
9.
National University of Singapore

Singapore

155 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

PHOTO: The main administration building of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.
pfctdayelise/Wikipedia
10.
Tsinghua University

China

136 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

11.
Peking University

China

128 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

12.
McGill University

Canada

127 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

13.
Imperial College London

United Kingdom

123 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

14.
University of Melbourne

Australia

123 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

15.
University of Toronto

Canada

115 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

16.
Monash University

Australia

110 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

17.
Trinity College Dublin

Ireland

106 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

18.
London Business School

United Kingdom

101 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

19.
University of Technology, Sydney

Australia

99 ULTRA HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS

20.
University College London

United Kingdom

The 10 most livable cities and their English speaking universities

Global Livability Survey

The Economist Intelligence Unit has released their annual ranking of the most  livable cities in The Global Livability SurveyA total of 140 cities were surveyed under five categories: stability, healthcare, culture and environment, education and infrastructure. While you have to pay for the report, CNNGO has a listing of the top 50 for free. And now, as am I want to do, we take a step further providing a list of English speaking university opportunities in the top 10 cities.

Top 10 most livable cities:

1. Melbourne, Australia–home to one of the greatest universities not just in Australia, but the world: The University of Melbourne is the highest placed Australian university in three of the four major world rankings. A few years back they revised their entire curriculum unveiling the Melbourne Model, distinguishing it from other Australian Universities.

2. Vienna, Austria-Fewer options in English exist, but Mozart’s home has some opportunities. Students looking for Management or Hospitality need look no further than Modul. Webster University with multiple campuses around the world has one in Vienna too, offering bachelor degrees in five areas. You could look further afield for the traditional universities both in and out of Vienna that offer programs in English.

3. Vancouver, Canada. You got your Ocean, you got your ski hills, you got your trees, you got your city…all compact and ready to use. Several great options exist for you:

4. Toronto, Canada

  • With 709 academic programs, few universities can compare to the opportunities afforded at the University of Toronto. Between 2005 and 2008, U of T researchers created 24 new  companies – more than any other Canadian university. We ranked 4th overall for commercialization among North American public universities.  Their professors are among the most cited in the world. FRom Insulin to Stem Cells, UT has been leading the way.
  • The third largest university in the country, York is host to a dynamic academic community of 55,000 students and 7,000 faculty and staff, as well as 250,000 alumni worldwide.
  • Ryerson has produced some of best in film, television, architecture, photography etc.
  • A short way from Toronto is Canada’s leader in Math, Computers and Coop: University of Waterloo.
  • While most of the above offer great degrees for artists, Toronto has its own world class art college: Ontario College of Art and Design.

=5. Calgary, Canada

  • In fall 2008, the University of Calgary became the first university in Canada to offer a four-year graduation guarantee to students embarking upon four-year degree programs in the faculties of science and arts.

=5. Adelaide, Australia

  • University of South Australia he 2011 QS World University Rankings ranked us 11th in Australia and equal 256th out of more than 10,000 universities worldwide, reflecting the fastest rise in the rankings of any Australian university for the second consecutive year. We were also ranked 23 in the world, and number three in Australia, in the 2012 QS top 50 worldwide institutions aged under 50.
  • The University of Adelaide is consistently ranked in the top 1% of universities in the world.

7. Sydney, Australia

  • Macquarie University According to the Good Universities Guide to Australian universities, starting salaries for Macquarie graduates have been ranked as the highest in Australia for ten consecutive years (1998–2007) and in 2009, the university received 5 star ratings in six different performance categories including non-government earnings, staff qualifications and toughness of admissions. 34,000 thousand students, of which 10,000 are international makes this a really dynamic place to study.
  • Despite its relatively short history, founded in 1949, University of New South Wales is recognised as one of Australia’s leading teaching and research institutions, and has developed a strong reputation in a number of fields. In 2011, UNSW was the first Australian university to be awarded five stars in the new QS Stars ratingsystem, which measures performance against international benchmarks.
  • The University of Sydney consistently ranks amongst the top universities in Australia and Oceania. In 2011, it was ranked 38th in the world; 3rd in Australia.

8. Helsinki, Finland

  • I know what you are thinking: They have programs in English? Yes, and most are free! Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences offers variety of Bachelor’s Degree, Master’s Degree and Specialisation Studies programmes in different fields of study. There are no tuition fees in the Bachelor’s or Master’s degree programme since higher education degrees are funded by the state through the Ministry of Education.
  • This Bachelor Programme is the first of its kind in the world. Experience (elämys in Finnish) and Wellness (wellbeing + fitness) are new fields of study in hospitality and tourism. E.g. events, music festivals, sport activities, art performances and cultural shows, social celebrations, special moments and treats.
  • It provides students with competences to run operations, understand consumers,perform experiences, scan business environments. This is just one of several English options at Haaga_Helia University of Applied sciences.
  • Diak has an innovative programme leading to the degree Bachelor in Social Services. The programme is in English. The special focus of the programme is on community development work. The curriculum will deal with the most urgent issues confronting social service work today.
  • Check out other option at the Study in Finland database.

9. Perth, Australia

  • With a primary focus on technology degrees, Curtin University receives high praise for Chemical Engineering; Earth and Marine Sciences; Statistics and Operational Research; Education; and Accounting and Finance, and overall.
  • Edith Cowann garned a spot on the Times 100 under 50 list.
  • University of Western Australia snuck into the Shanghai Jiatong top 100 rankings.

10. Auckland, New Zealand

  • Home to the highest internationally ranked university, The University of Aukland, brings a whopping 4000 international students to their campus.
  • another 3500 international students study nearby at the Aukland University of TechnologyAUT University promotes itself as an advocate of innovative approaches to teaching, learning and research. In particular its focus is on providing a pragmatic ‘real world’ approach, ensuring excellence in learning, teaching and developing outstanding graduates for practice in their chosen fields. AUT’s learning environment encourages interaction between students and with their lecturers.

And the next ten cities?

11. Zurich, Switzerland

=12. Geneva, Switzerland

=12. Osaka, Japan

=14. Stockholm, Sweden

=14. Hamburg, Germany

=16. Montreal, Canada

=16. Paris, France

=18. Tokyo, Japan

=18. Frankfurt, Germany

20. Brisbane, Australia

New Australian University Search tool

The challenge of finding the right fit when it comes to your college search is definitely one that gives me a lot of concern. Click on Search and Tips in the categories and you can see I have profiled many tools and techniques for helping you understand yourself and find the right university. While America has many searchable databases, most other countries have few. For Australia, we relied on the uberagent IDP and Study in Australia, neither of which were particularly satisfying. Now the Australian Government gets in the game with My University. This new website allows user an inside glimpse at such items as:

  • fees,
  • courses,
  • course cut-offs,
  • lecturer qualifications,
  • student satisfaction rates,
  • graduate employment outcomes,
  • enrolment numbers, and
  • student/staff ratios.

According to the Canberra Times, students can also discover “It also provides information on each university’s services and amenities – from childcare places, car parking, bus routes, supermarkets, banks and pubs on campus to student welfare services, clubs and societies.” My initial playing around reveals two challenges:

1) It is unclear if international students will get accurate information as it has only two categories–domesteic and Commonwealth

2) You need to know your ATAR score

Running with Medicine as the searchword came up with 36 results. Clearly something is not right. Granted some have medical in the title like Bachelor of Medical Radiation Science (Nuclear Medicine) at University of Newcastle, but it really makes me wonder who did the programing if a Bachelor of arts in Communication & Media Studies n.e.c. from Southern Cross University can show up on the list?

The website allows you to compare up to 8 universities at once, but the information provided is basic: ATAR scores and fees. Really? this is what 1.5 million bought you? So I would say the course search is a bust as is.

The university compare feature is more robust:

  • graduate outcomes
  • student demographics
  • staff demographics
  • staff student ratio
  • campus locations
  • and most importantly student satisfaction by subject area.

Let’s see where this will go.

World’s top 200 universities


1 California Institute of Technology United States
2 Harvard University United States
2 Stanford University United States
4 University of Oxford United Kingdom
5 Princeton University United States
6 University of Cambridge United Kingdom
7 Massachusetts Institute of Technology United States
8 Imperial College London United Kingdom
9 University of Chicago United States
10 University of California, Berkeley United States

See complete list of rankings here.

Field Guide to Design

Field Guide to Design

What is the study?

Industrial Design

Interior Design

·

Graphic Design

Learn about it at YouTube:

Magazines

Podcasts worth listening to:

Courses

Five great programs

USA

UK

Canada

Australia

RISD

Central Saint Martins

Concordia University

Swinburne University

Purdue

Loughborough

Ontario College of Art and Design

University of Western Sydney

Carnegie Mellon

Brunell

University of Alberta

University of New South Wales

University of Illinois

University of Glasgow

University of Toronto

Curtin University

Ohio State University

York University

Carleton University

Australia Academy of Design

What can you do with a degree in Design?

· Graphic design (UTK): http://career.utk.edu/wcidwtm/html/graphicdesign.html

· Interior Design (UTK): http://career.utk.edu/wcidwtm/html/interiordesign.html

· Industrial Design (NCSU): http://www.ncsu.edu/majors-careers/do_with_major_in/showmajor.php?id=37