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admission numbers update

A few more Colleges have released their admission data. 

 

College

Overall

American University

35.1%

Amherst College:

13.7

Barnard

19.5%

Bates

21.4

Boston College

28%

Boston University

32%

Bowdoin

14.9%

Brown University 

8.49%

California Institute of Technology:

 

Carleton College:

 

Claremont McKenna College

9.8%

Colgate University:

 

College of William and Mary

33%

Columbia University 

6.1%

Cornell University’s 

14.9%

Dartmouth College 

10.3%

Davidson College:

 

Duke

9.4%

Emory University:

23%

Emory (oxford)

38%

George Washington University

45.5%

Georgetown

16.4%

Grinnell

24.6

Hamilton College:

23.9

Harvard

5.3%

Harvey Mudd

13%

Johns Hopkins

12.4

Kenyon

23.8%

Macalester

34%

University of Maryland

44.1%

Middlebury

17%

MIT

8.01%

UNC

18.9%

University of Notre Dame:

19.70%

Northwestern

13%

The University of Pennsylvania 

9.9%

Pitzer

12.9%

Pomona

9.76 %

Princeton University 

6.99%

Rice University:

14.7%

USC

17.5%

Scripps

28%

Stanford

5.05 

Smith College:

 

Swarthmore College

12.2%

Tufts

16%

University of Chicago

7.8%

UVA

28.5%

Vanderbilt

11.29%

Vassar College:

 

Yale University’s 

6.49%.

Washington University in St. Louis:

 

Wellesley College:

 

Wesleyan University

21.9%

Williams

16.8%

 

“just Google Supreme Court justices, recent presidents, Matt Damon, or CEOs of big-name companies and see where they graduated from.”

In an op-ed, a high school senior lamenting his rejections from Brown and other colleges conisders his gloomy future as he asserts this well repeated truth:

An education at an Ivy League or other top 20 schools appears to be an important ingredient for future success—just Google Supreme Court justices, recent presidents, Matt Damon, or CEOs of big-name companies and see where they graduated from.

Challenge accepted. So where did the supreme court justices go to college? According to Supreme court’s own website, virtually all went to an elite school. They followed this up by attending an equally elite law school. Of the 12, 10 list high pedigre colleges-Harvard, Stanford, Georgetwon etc. One has another proivate school, Holy Cross. The last list no college. Wikipedia cleared up any doubt: Princeton. So pretty clearly if you want one of the 12 highest seats in the land, go to an elite school. 

Recent presidents are equally elitest:

  • Obama graduate from Columbia (but started at liberal arts college Occidental)
  • Bush went to Yale
  • Clinton Georgetown
  • Papa Bush went to Yale

Reagen is the last presenident to attend a non-lite school: Eureka college. Continue back and the most eliet college on the list until Kennedy’s Harvard is Ford’s Michigan. 34% have advanced degrees. Indeed, that seems as important as an elite school these days. But 11 Presidents did not graduate and in several cases did not even go to college. So, it looks like William Pang is on track with his lamentings. 

Matt Damon did go to Harvard, but did not graduate. According to Box Office Mojo, Matt ranks twenty-second in Box office revenue. To compare: 

  • Ben Stiller (20) dropped out of UCLA. 
  • Bruce Willis (10) dropped out of Montclair State University
  • Johnny Depp (9) dropped out of high school
  • Robbin Williams (7) dropped out Claremont to pursue the study of acting at the college of Marin and then Julliard, where he also dropped out. 
  • Tom Cruise (6) did not go to college, but did drop out of seminary
  • Eddie Murphy (5) also did not go to college. 
  • Harrison Ford (4) graduated from Rippon College.
  • Samuel Jackson (3) actually graduated with an acting degree from Morehouse College
  • Morgan Freeman (2) turned down a scholarship to join the ariforce. 
  • Tom Hanks (1) graduated from Cal State Sacremento with a degree in drama. 

So clearly, if you want to be an actor, drop out of college or study acting pretty much anywhere. 

Finally for CEOs. Do you need to go to an elite school to become one? No. But it may help. Johnathon Wai notes 38% of Fortune 500 CEOs attended elite schools. Indeed, if you want to join the power elite, attending an elite school clearly ahs a corelation:

But correlation does not equal causation. 

Admission number update (April 9)

A few more schools have released data that is now incorperated in the table below. 

 

College

Overall

Amherst College:

13.7

Barnard

19.5%

Bates

21.4

Boston College

28%

Boston University

32%

Bowdoin

14.9%

Brown University 

8.49%

California Institute of Technology:

 

Carleton College:

 

Claremont McKenna College

 

Colgate University:

 

Columbia University 

6.1%

Cornell University’s 

14.9%

Dartmouth College 

10.3%

Davidson College:

 

Duke

9.4%

Emory University:

23%

George Washington University

45.5%

Georgetown

16.4%

Grinnell

24.6

Hamilton College:

 

Harvard

5.3%

Harvey Mudd

13%

Johns Hopkins

10.22

Middlebury

17%

MIT

8.01%

UNC

18.9%

University of Notre Dame:

19.70%

Northwestern

13%

The University of Pennsylvania 

9.9%

Pomona

9.76 %

Princeton University 

6.99%

Rice University:

14.7%

USC

17.5%

Stanford

5.05 %

Smith College:

 

Swarthmore College

12

Tufts

16%

 

 

UVA

28.5%

Vanderbilt

11.29%

Vassar College:

 

Yale University’s 

6.49%.

Washington University in St. Louis:

 

Wellesley College:

 

Wesleyan University

 

Williams

16.8%

 

who knew?

Sure BU and Chicago are well known examples of massive application growth, but BU can barely hold a candle to some on this list:

Only Chicago and Vandy have triple digit application growth in the US news top 25 list:

numbers update


College

Overall

Boston College

28%

Boston University

32%

Bowdoin

14.9%

Brown University 

8.49%

Columbia University 

6.1%

Cornell University’s 

14.9%

Dartmouth College 

10.3%

Duke

9.4%

George Washington University

 

Georgetown

16.4%

Harvey Mudd4

13%

Johns Hopkins

10.22

Middlebury

17%

MIT

8.01%

Northwestern

13%

The University of Pennsylvania 

9.9%

Pomona

9.76 %

Princeton University 

6.99%

USC

17.5%

Stanford

5.05 

 

Tufts

16%

UVA

28.5%

Vanderbilt

11.29%

Yale University’s 

6.49%.

 

 

Williams

16.8%

The book everyone is talking about

Came out on St. Patrick’s day: Frank Bruni’s Where You Go Is Not Who You’ll Be: An Antidote to the College Admissions Mania.” 

Why does it matter? In the next few weeks, many selective colleges will trumpet their NEW record number of applications. The list will look familiar. The usual suspects keep getting more and more applications. I am curious how many have had repeated an application to an institution that had previously rejected them. Last year I had my first. But I suspect it is something becoming more common. Bruni’s thesis is in the title. The subtitle might better be anecdotes as he profiles people who were dinied by elite schools and yet ended up thriving elsewhere…both in and after college. You can read Bruni’s op-ed piece at the New York Times to get a sense of his thesis. Nick Romeo has had a chance to review the book and notes the contradictions:

His fondness for such anecdotal evidence clashes awkwardly with statistical data he includes. He cites a study by the sociologist D. Michael Lindsay that found that nearly two-thirds of a set of 550 powerful Americans did not attend institutions considered elite. But reversing the framing would produce a very different conclusion: More than a thirddid attend an elite institution, a disproportionate percentage considering that highly selective schools represent only a tiny fraction of educational options in America. He further undermines his own case by noting that over 40 percent of the incoming class at Yale Law School in 2013 and 2014 came from one of the eight schools in the Ivy League, while less than 20 percent of the class had graduated from state schools. 

Other commentaors include the NYT

Free tools for Self Discovery

Below are various free self assessments. 
Personality
Strengths

Learning styles

Majors/Career inventories

 

Free tools for Self Discovery

x

Free tools for Self Discovery

Below are various free self assessments. 

Personality

Strengths

 

 

 

 

Learning styles

 

 

Majors/Career inventories

  • See more at: http://www.internationalcounselor.org/archives/2492#sthash.aCNmgskM.dpuf

Plexuss does rankings

Not sure how long this thing has been around, but they need some serious help in defining what a good college experience is. Founder JP Novin claims “I have never been more excited about a company as I am today about Plexuss. We are in the business of changing student’s future. Nothing can be more exciting.” Except, they are actively misleading students with their poorly executed rankings:

Of course they leave out the “speial sauce” which seems like a rather key ingrediant. The rankings look familiar although it does give a boost to public universities, with 5 appearing in the top 20 (US News has 1 ), but totally punishes Liberal arts and science colleges. Williams in 219? Amherst comes in 223, but University of Massachusetts-Amherst comes in 62nd? Swarthmore comes in at 220. 

Clearly their formula is bunk. Obviously they choose measures that favor research output over the learning experience. Worse they cannot even set their toggles right to get the correct information. While QS, Shanghai and Reuters don’t even collect college data on Liberal arts colleges, US news does. They keep it seperate from the research universities for a reason. Take a look at Swarthmore, one of the serious power hitters in higher education and yet they managed to find 219 better colleges. 

While I like the idea of a super agregator, this one is not working. Obvioulsy, not only should they use the actual liberal arts measure, but the Washington Monthly ranking would probably be wise to include. While QS, Reuters and Shanghai could be included in the National Research universities, they need to be left off for the LACs. For what it is worth, here is the top 20. 

#1
Harvard University
Cambridge,MA
#2
#7
#2
#2
#5
#2
#3
#3
#7
#5
#1
#4
#1
#4
#7
#5
Yale University
New Haven,CT
#3
#6
#4
#6
#10
#21
#7
#7
#5
#24
#5
#9
#7
#12
#8
#10
#7
#23
#13

#11
#20
#37
#14
#12
#16
#31
#10
#13
#12
#67
#11
#14
#12
#19
#15
#15
#23
#44
#17
#16
#28
#45
#12
#17
Brown University
Providence,RI
#14
#13
#19
#18
#23
#59
#22
#19
#41
#70
#16
#20
#41
#68
#21